Author Topic: CENTURY GLASS, Edmonton, London and Lighthouses ?!?  (Read 4623 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Max

  • Global Moderator
  • Members
  • *
  • Posts: 3473
  • Gender: Female
CENTURY GLASS, Edmonton, London and Lighthouses ?!?
« on: September 03, 2005, 12:10:40 PM »
Anne E.B recently posted about a ‘Monster Bowl’ she had bought, and requested more information.  Whilst flipping through an old edition of The Glass Circle News, I came across a photo of Anne’s bowl taken from a recently discovered sales ledger:

http://tinypic.com/ajusew.jpg   Anne's bowl, right way up

http://tinypic.com/ajs4lt.jpg      Anne's bowl 'upside down plinth'

http://tinypic.com/dbk22d.jpg    Photo of 'Century Glass' Mould 450**


The article was about a previously unknown glassworks based in Edmonton, London, known as Century Glass.  Glen and Anne (the 'other' Anne... :) )expressed an interest in this article by Nicholas Dolan, which I am using as the basis for my posting:

‘The discovery of a hitherto unrecognised glassworks resulted from the donation of a sales ledger to Shipley Art Gallery in Gateshead.  Numbered 401, it appeared to be the third in a series of ledgers and was labelled ‘CENTURY GLASS’ on the spine.  This was identified from the Pottery Gazette Reference Book of 1956, as being the trade name of Century Glassworks Ltd, based at the Angel Factory Colony, Angel Road, Edmonton, London (now part of the A406 North Circular Road).  

Their products are listed as Pressed Glassware – biscuit jars, ashtrays, candlesticks, celeries, cigarette boxes, comports, condiments sets, cups and saucers, fruit sets, grapefruits, hotel ware, lemon squeezers, mounting glass, novelties, plates, rose (bowls), salad bowls, salad servers, sundae glasses, trinket sets, tumblers, vases, water sets, hors d’oeuvres sets, sugars and creams, baskets, jardinières, etc.  The ledger contains 59 different pattern names, most evocative of the era – place names, the Festival of Britain etc. as well as those descriptive of the patterns.  In fact, their utilitarian products were so all pervading that many houses will still have examples in their cupboards today.

The Angel Factory Colony was established in 1920/21 but it is unlikely that the glassworks was formed there before 1941.  The site was redeveloped in the 1980’s as a supermarket complex.  The ledger spans from 16th April 1945 for celery vases and bowls, to 25th April 1953 for a fancy dish.

None of the glass seems to have been marked, although there is one Application for a Registered Design mould number 41:  “Toy set.  Coffee set. Filed under No. 843996 11/7/45 through G.R. Walsh & Co. Crosby St. Halifax.  Circle print, Sugar basin 8gr.  Pr small chest.  8 body moulds.  8 bottoms.  6 plungers.  6 rings”.

The majority of the patterns illustrated are typical honest designs – chunky diamonds, crosses, ovals and circles on timeless shapes for an era needing salts, mustards, bowls, candlesticks, trinket sets and vases doubling up as celeries to avoid the luxury tax.  Familiar items from the ledger were illustrated.  Notable are a bowl with dolphin-shaped handles (mould 417, 15th Feb. 1950, supplied to Schwartz), a stepped square plinth that, upside down, could be used as a bowl (**mould 450, 16th Sept. 1950) and an ashtray for the Pipesmoker with a shaped hollow to hold the bowl of the pipe (mould 504, 29th May 1951)'.



I’m sure Anne E.B. will be cheered to know that she wasn’t far wrong in using the stepped plinth in the ‘upside down’ position.   :D



With thanks to:       Mr Nicholas Dolan, Author of article ‘Century  
                             Glass', pages 16/17, No.103, Glass Circle News.

                             Dr D Watts, Glass Circle News Editor & Hon. Vice President
                             www.glasscircle.org

Also thanks to:  Shipley Art Gallery, Gateshead



The above work is not a direct quote, but has been altered slightly by myself  for the Glass Message Board.  M Kimber
I am not a man


Offline aa

  • Glass Professional
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 1784
    • http://www.adamaaronson.com
CENTURY GLASS, Edmonton, London and Lighthouses ?!?
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2005, 12:23:38 PM »
On the Glass Circle's website it states: "Membership is open to all who are interested in Glass"  Around 1985 I first heard about the glass circle from a gentleman who visited our gallery in Piccadilly. Slightly younger and more impressionable than I am today I expressed an interested in joining but was rebuffed and told quite clearly that I could not join as I was a "dealer".  The gentleman in question used the word "dealer" as if it was rather unsavoury! Perhaps things have changed....? :D
Hello & Welcome to the Board! Sometimes my replies are short & succinct, other times lengthy. Apologies in advance if they are not to your satisfaction; my main concern is to be accurate for posterity & to share my limited knowledge
For information on exhibitions & events and to see images of my new work join my Facebook group
https://www.facebook.com/adamaaronsonglass
Introduction to Glassblowing course:a great way to spend an afternoon http://www.zestgallery.com/glass.


Offline Frank

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 9194
  • Gender: Male
    • Glass history
    • Gateway
Frank A.
Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
Scotland's Glass - Ysart Glass
Glass Zoo - Glass Study.COM
Commercial Czech


Offline Frank

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 9194
  • Gender: Male
    • Glass history
    • Gateway
CENTURY GLASS, Edmonton, London and Lighthouses ?!?
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2005, 12:57:31 PM »
Glass Circle was more of a Gentlemans club, but I do beleive they are more open nowadays.
Frank A.
Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
Scotland's Glass - Ysart Glass
Glass Zoo - Glass Study.COM
Commercial Czech


Offline Glen

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 2883
  • Gender: Female
    • Carnival Glass Research and Writing
CENTURY GLASS, Edmonton, London and Lighthouses ?!?
« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2005, 04:03:02 PM »
Quote from: "Frank"
Glass Circle was more of a Gentlemans club


That's me out then  :shock: Actually I was a member for a while.

Many, many thanks, Max, for the information and your transcription. I didn't realise it was Nick Dolan who had written the article. I thought Nick was more into lighthouses today  :lol:  

Thanks too, to Frank, for the extra illustrations.

Max noted:
Quote
a bowl with dolphin-shaped handles (mould 417, 15th Feb. 1950, supplied to Schwartz)

I think I may have a "mystery" bowl that fits the description. Was there an illustration of this item?

Many many thanks again - much appreciated information that I am sure will be of interest to many.

Glen
Just releasedCarnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-booksthree volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood


Offline Frank

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 9194
  • Gender: Male
    • Glass history
    • Gateway
CENTURY GLASS, Edmonton, London and Lighthouses ?!?
« Reply #5 on: September 03, 2005, 04:39:15 PM »
I used to have one of the plinths, until someone decided it was perfect for serving rice in.  :(  It wasn't, still it was a nice clean division into two pieces.
Frank A.
Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
Scotland's Glass - Ysart Glass
Glass Zoo - Glass Study.COM
Commercial Czech


Offline Anne

  • GMB Tech Support Manager & "Board (never bored) Dame"
  • Global Moderator
  • Members
  • *
  • Posts: 11173
  • Gender: Female
  • I has a stick to poke the server with yes!
    • Glass trinket sets
    • Cumbria England
    • ALAVNA Vintage & Collectable Glass
CENTURY GLASS, Edmonton, London and Lighthouses ?!?
« Reply #6 on: September 03, 2005, 05:21:00 PM »
Thanks Max, this is fascinating, and Frank for the extra pics... you had me dashing off into the kitchen to check if my lemon squeezer was one of those shown (it isn't, but it is glass). :)


Offline paradisetrader

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 937
  • Gender: Male
CENTURY GLASS, Edmonton, London and Lighthouses ?!?
« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2005, 06:01:18 PM »
What a revelation !!!
Ok so their production was mainly utilitarian but it seems incredible that their existence was "unknown" !! (except to Frank of course).
Anyway Max thanks for your clear and fully attributed posting making the whole thing so easy to follow.
I'm guessing that Anne EB, the displaced womble one, has not yet seem this ! She will be thrilled when she does !
Pete


Offline Max

  • Global Moderator
  • Members
  • *
  • Posts: 3473
  • Gender: Female
CENTURY GLASS, Edmonton, London and Lighthouses ?!?
« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2005, 07:34:53 PM »
I'm glad this article was of use to people on the GMB.   :D

I'm not quite sure why Mr Nicholas Dolan should be interested in lighthouses...  :shock:  ...but here's the Dolphin handled bowl for Glen:

http://tinypic.com/dc3cl3.jpg

Frank...er....seeing Century Glass was hitherto unrecognised, how come you have pictures relating to it???????  (http://tcwozere.co.uk/smileys/ac38.gif)
I am not a man


Offline Frank

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 9194
  • Gender: Male
    • Glass history
    • Gateway
CENTURY GLASS, Edmonton, London and Lighthouses ?!?
« Reply #9 on: September 03, 2005, 07:42:42 PM »
Max - define unrecognised :? and you have your answer.

Well, Moncrieff's certainly made some lighthouse bulbs and you will probably find Nazeing involved in Lighthouses too. You need some big tough glass in lighthouses... lenses, mirrors, bulbs etcetera. It is an area of glass history woefully under-researched.
Frank A.
Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
Scotland's Glass - Ysart Glass
Glass Zoo - Glass Study.COM
Commercial Czech

 

Search
eBay.com
eBay.co.uk

Link to Glass Encyclopedia
Link to Glass Museum
Enter
key words
to search
Amazon.com