Author Topic: Chance Nursery Rhyme Transfers  (Read 1405 times)

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Offline Bernard C

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Chance Nursery Rhyme Transfers
« on: December 26, 2008, 11:11:27 AM »
On Monday we visited my niece Liz, who helped initiate David Encill's research and book (see here).   I took a copy of Chance Expressions to show her — the first time she's seen it.

On p.57 she noticed the Nursery Rhyme design, and she showed me some examples of bone china from an unmarked child's tea service carrying the same transfers.   It's the first time I've seen the same transfers on both china and glass.   But are they the same?   Are the enamels used for the two the same, melting at the same temperature, or different, melting at temperatures more appropriate to the two materials?

She asked if her name was in the book, quite prepared to order and buy a copy if it was there, as she had never had her name in a book before.   I had to explain that David hadn't asked for her full name and so hadn't included it.   How easily a certain sale is lost!   Future authors take note.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline David E

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Re: Chance Nursery Rhyme Transfers
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2008, 12:18:04 PM »
The Nursery Rhyme transfers were almost certainly 'open-stock' and made by Johnson, Matthey. There would not have been different types of transfers made for glass and ceramics, and they were made specifically for ceramics. Because of the lower-firing temperature required for glass, the only real problem faced by Chance (and other glass makers) was that some colours (reds in particular) could turn rather 'muddy' and it would often require a few test samples to establish the correct temperature to use – or not to use the transfer at all.

See: p.83, Making Fiestaware / Application of Patterns / Transfers, second column.

As for crediting people, there is a limit as to how far one should go. After all, I did acknowledge "those kind folk on The Glass Message Board" and, "Sincere thanks to everyone who offered support." before detailing a huge raft of people who had been of particular help. Is saving a newspaper cutting, a sufficient reason to mention your niece? I was already collecting Chance glass at this stage and there is mention of this in another thread somewhere (I posted a photo of a white Gingham handkerchief vase).
David
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Offline Max

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Re: Chance Nursery Rhyme Transfers
« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2008, 12:20:54 PM »
Quote
She asked if her name was in the book, quite prepared to order and buy a copy if it was there, as she had never had her name in a book before.   I had to explain that David hadn't asked for her full name and so hadn't included it.   How easily a certain sale is lost!   Future authors take note.

At that time, both David and I were already collecting Chance glass, and I believe David had already started to attempt to research Chance glass then. 

I think the Citrus Fruits transfers might have been used on china too in the USA (Page 64, Chance Expressions) although David would have to confirm/refute that.   :)

Edit:  posts crossed!  ::)



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Online Lustrousstone

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Re: Chance Nursery Rhyme Transfers
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2008, 10:31:24 PM »
Royal Bride is found on Myott china. Daisy is found on china too


Offline David E

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Re: Chance Nursery Rhyme Transfers
« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2008, 01:14:28 PM »
Max: Yes, Citrus Fruits was open-stock, although finding a ceramic example would be a bonus.

Christine: There was also the Vintage Car transfers, which were used by many other manufacturers: glass and ceramic. Not sure about Daisy though: I understand this was originally open-stock but the entire range was bought up by Chance making it exclusive to them. I suppose a few variations might have sneaked through before Chance 'claimed' exclusivity, but I've never seen an example.
David
► The Curious History of the Bulb Vase ◄
 A new book by Patricia Coccoris

Contact ► Cortex Design ◄ to order any book

Offline Bernard C

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Re: Chance Nursery Rhyme Transfers
« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2008, 08:36:47 AM »
As for crediting people, there is a limit as to how far one should go. After all, I did acknowledge "those kind folk on The Glass Message Board" and, "Sincere thanks to everyone who offered support." before detailing a huge raft of people who had been of particular help. Is saving a newspaper cutting, a sufficient reason to mention your niece? I was already collecting Chance glass at this stage and there is mention of this in another thread somewhere (I posted a photo of a white Gingham handkerchief vase).

David (& Max) — I wasn't passing comment on or being critical of you, David, just recounting what happened a few days ago.   The point I was making is that the acknowledgements section does have something of a subscribers' list about it, and that a proportion of those mentioned will regard their inclusion as a reason for buying the book.   You can't isolate the acknowledgements from the marketing.   That's all I both intended and meant to say.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot

Offline nigel benson

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Re: Chance Nursery Rhyme Transfers
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2009, 11:23:54 PM »

Quote
You can't isolate the acknowledgements from the marketing.

Really Bernard, I thought acknowledgements were just that; in other words the place where the author thanks people for various things that they have done to help. The fact that people might want to see their name in print is more to to with their own inner feelings - much like authors who pay to have their story published.

Often, the acknowlegdement list may have to be shrunk in order to fit the space, hence the generalisations referred to by David above. Maybe I'm naive, but I can never remember reading an acknowledgement section to a book and feeling "I must buy that" - more usually, if I have been acknowledged I'm interested in the subject already and would buy a copy anyway.


Nigel

 

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