No-one likes general adverts, and ours hadn't been updated for ages, so we're having a clear-out and a change round to make the new ones useful to you. These new adverts bring in a small amount to help pay for the board and keep it free for you to use, so please do use them whenever you can, Let our links help you find great books on glass or a new piece for your collection. Thank you for supporting the Board.

Author Topic: exhibition glass  (Read 1246 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline denlyn

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 1
exhibition glass
« on: September 18, 2005, 02:18:01 AM »
I am looking for information regarding how exhibition glass (red ruby flash souvenir) was actually made. Can anyone help with info or point me to a website that I can research. There seems to be a lot for sale in USA and Canada, but I have drawn a blank about manufacture.  Thankyou

Support the Glass Message Board by finding a book via book-seek.com


Anonymous

  • Guest
exhibition glass
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2005, 10:32:39 AM »
Hi Denlyn

I'm not sure where you are based, but I think what is called "exhibition glass" in Australia is ruby stained Early American Pressed Glass (or EAPG). Flashed glass is when there is a fine layer of coloured glass over clear glass, and the glass is cut to expose the clear glass underneath.

The most common patterns of ruby stained EAPG in Australia is Button Arches, by Duncan Miller.

You might be interested in the ruby stain museum:

http://www.rubystainmuseum.com/

Cheers,

Cathy Bannister

Support the Glass Message Board by finding glass through glass-seek.com


Anonymous

  • Guest
exhibition glass
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2005, 10:47:40 AM »
Ah - I just realised that I didn't make that as clear as I could have.  Your exhibition glass almost certainly won't be flashed, it's ruby stained. Flashed is something different.

If it were true flashed, then it would most likely be bohemian, but I don't know much about that!

Clear as mud?? :)

Cathy B

Support the Glass Message Board by finding a book via book-seek.com


Anonymous

  • Guest
exhibition glass
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2005, 07:08:35 AM »
Thank you for both replies. I think you are on the right track with calling it ruby stain glassware with button arches. I think this is what my five pieces are, although one has the thumbprint pattern at the bottom under the red stain. Duncan & Miller has been referred to me and thanks, I will have a look at the website you mention. Cheers Lyn :lol:

Support the Glass Message Board by finding glass through glass-seek.com


Anonymous

  • Guest
exhibition glass
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2005, 08:23:15 AM »
Thumbprint pattern under the red stain is possibly "Kings Crown" by either Adams (part of the US Glass Co.), sometime around 1900, Tiffin (mid century) or Indiana (1970s onwards). If it has an etched date, then it will be easier!

Here's a nice site which explains the difference between flashed, stained and cased glass.

http://www.patternglass.com/FlashCaseStain/FlashCaseStain.htm

Cheers,

Cathy B

Support the Glass Message Board by finding a book via book-seek.com


Offline Frank

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 9396
  • Gender: Male
    • Glass history
    • Gateway
exhibition glass
« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2005, 06:42:15 PM »
Except that the decription for flashing is in fact casing!!!

See here for the difference between flashing and casing http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,1247.0.html
Frank A.
Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
Scotland's Glass - Ysart Glass
Glass Zoo - Glass Study.COM
Commercial Czech

Support the Glass Message Board by finding glass through glass-seek.com


Anonymous

  • Guest
exhibition glass
« Reply #6 on: September 20, 2005, 01:05:15 AM »
Thanks for the link, Frank!

I take it that the physical descriptions of the different sorts of glass themselves were right (while the techniques described were wrong)?

Having read your description of how cased glass was made, it's no wonder staining was more popular!

Cathy

Support the Glass Message Board by finding a book via book-seek.com


 

Look for glass on
 ebay.co.uk 
Look for glass on
 eBay.com (US)

Link to Glass Encyclopedia
Link to Glass Museum


This Website is provided by Angela Bowey, PO Box 113, Paihia 0247, New Zealand