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Author Topic: limescale (or not)  (Read 2408 times)

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Offline glass

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Re: limescale (or not)
« Reply #20 on: March 25, 2009, 08:45:15 PM »
Do you think I shud take it back to the boot sales and get a refund!!!

No, count your losses and learn through your pocket, that will soon teach you not to make the same mistake again.

I must also say that Brasso does not work on every type of stain, it takes time to learn which types of stains needs what treatment whether its DIY or professional

Cheers

Sean
Struck By Lightning

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Offline Anne

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Re: limescale (or not)
« Reply #21 on: March 26, 2009, 02:48:46 AM »
I've used Silvo (the silver polish version of Brasso) on glass and that worked well. Silvo is supposed to be gentler than Brasso apparently.

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Offline sueglass

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Re: limescale (or not)
« Reply #22 on: March 27, 2009, 11:00:24 PM »
I was talking to a lady in an antiques shop and she had an old 80s Hostess trolley with cloudy glass dishes which she couldn't shift and I suggested Calgon but told her I had never tried it myself. When I went back the next time she said it had worked. Sue

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Offline Paul S.

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Re: limescale (or not)
« Reply #23 on: March 28, 2009, 08:39:21 AM »
thanks for the suggestion of Calgon Sue.
Never heard of it.   Is it a product aimed specifically at cleaning glass?             Remember, you're talking to someone who has already laid out a small mortgage on Hagesan Blue and Kilrok K (without results)  -  so I'm rather wary of buying more chemicals with similar results.       Is it expensive?
Now that the weekend is here, I will try the suggestion of Brasso on a nylon type abrasive pad and see what results I get.     I will let you know how I get on.   Because of the shape, I can at least get insude the vase very easily.         cheers           Paul.

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Offline nigel benson

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Re: limescale (or not)
« Reply #24 on: March 28, 2009, 10:24:52 AM »
New nylon abrasive pads can scratch glass!!  :( :huh:

In my experience, it just ain't worth the time or investment in various branded things in order to shift something that doesn't want to go with that little extra effort when cleaning originally. Much better, and ultimately cheaper, to have it cleaned professionally.

However, good luck with your efforts; I'm looking forward to the report back  ;) :)

Nigel

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Offline Paul S.

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Re: limescale (or not)
« Reply #25 on: March 28, 2009, 12:25:51 PM »
thanks for the warning Nigel  -  I will try a small area first using a worn pad, and see how I get on.     If it looks iffy, then I will revert to a linen pad.    Will keep you advised.     cheers        Paul.

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Offline Paul S.

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Re: limescale (or not)
« Reply #26 on: March 29, 2009, 11:29:41 AM »
As a possible last comment to this thread  -  thanks to everyone who suggested brasso  -  which I have now used, and it does indeed work.     I put the cloth polishing wheel onto the Black & Decker, soaked it all in Brasso and buffed the inside of the vase for 30 - 40 minutes.   This has resulted in a ruduction of the matt surface by about 50%  -  60%  -  and I will probably stop there, althoy I cud spend a week on it and get a superb finish.     The whole thing looks better.     Wonder what it is in the Brasso that achieves this - some sort of polishing compound in suspension maybe.           cheers           Paul

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