Author Topic: Paperweight  (Read 1037 times)

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Offline tubitha

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Paperweight
« on: September 27, 2005, 07:12:24 PM »
Not exactly sure what this paperweight is but would like to know if anyone out there can tell me.

Base is flat and polished and the pictures I have put in as a link should give you an idea of the rest.

http://tinypic.com/e0n814.jpg
http://tinypic.com/e0n900.jpg
http://tinypic.com/e0n8s9.jpg
http://tinypic.com/e0n8uc.jpg
http://tinypic.com/e0n900.jpg

Hope these are easy to view

Carol


Offline Leni

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Paperweight
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2005, 07:39:12 PM »
Looks quite similar to the Ferro and Lazzarini (now now Eugenio Ferro) one I posted here recently.

I would guess it's Murano, anyway.  You say the base is flat and polished; could we see a picture?

Leni
Leni


Offline tubitha

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Paperweight
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2005, 08:38:58 PM »
Attached are links to the pictures of the base I can see why you think it is Murano but I can't see any difference between it and a picture in the Scottish Paperweight book by Bob Hall page 53 top right, the dimensions also match up for height and diameter.

So I wondered if it was indeed a Frank Eisner as we acquired it in Perth recently.

Anyway here are pictures of the base as requested.

http://tinypic.com/e0ohza.jpg

http://tinypic.com/e0ojfl.jpg

Carol


Offline KevinH

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Paperweight
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2005, 11:07:49 PM »
Hi Carol,

Yes, the weight is of the type that is usually attributed to Frank Eisner and, as you say, is covered in Bob Hall's book.

Several of these have appeared on the market in the past two or three years. A number have been sold through eBay. They are of a Bohemian / Czech style but supposedly made in the 1930s at the Moncrieff works which, if true, means that the Ysart family allowed more than just one other person (Jesus Brasso, who produced colourful flower baskets of a particluar style) to make occasional decorative items.

Some people have doubted the Frank Eisner attribution as there has been conflicting information but little, as yet, to help sort out the truth. As part of my presentation at the Ysartglass conference in Perth last month, I spoke about these weights and added an extra piece of intrigue by showing one with proven Ysart canes included!

Most of the examples I have seen have had different coloured flowers and the green (or other colour) ground has had a high central point when seen in profile. But I have also seen a few like yours with a flatter ground and with a single colour for the flowers.

However, could you please confirm whether or not there is a grid of air bubbles beneath any, or all, of the flower petals, as this is something that I have noted in almost all the others I have personally examined.
KevinH


Offline tubitha

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Paperweight
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2005, 05:31:21 PM »
Hi Kevin

Yes I remember your presentation at the glass conference and that is why I remembered the weights and the maker.

Anyway there is a grid of air bubbles under all of the flower petals as you describe so it looks like it matches the others that you have seen in the past.

Carol


 

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