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Author Topic: Translating glass terms  (Read 1807 times)

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Sklounion

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Translating glass terms
« on: September 28, 2005, 05:17:11 AM »
Daily familiarity with a second language does not make one any less prone to making errors, when translating documents about glass, than the use of Babel-fish or other translation packages.

One also needs to be aware that language changes.

So when one member of this board who shall remain nameless, (Yes, you know the one, that fellow that contributes from France) :oops:  :oops: , translated Glace as ice-cream, with-out checking for its historical meaning,

Colbert was a chef.

Thanks to my learned friend for pointing up my error.

The word Glace was used for both mirrored and plate-glass in the 17th century. Colbert was a glass-maker.

Somewhat different!! :lol:  :lol:

Currently miroir is used, but sometimes the archaic word appears.

Humble apologies for mis-leading people, the thread in question has been edited.

(Goes off, licking self-inflicted wounds and muttering: "I must never assume, I must never assume etc....)


Offline Bernard C

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Translating glass terms
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2005, 07:01:28 AM »
Marcus — Thanks for making me smile.

I look at it this way.   You can be one of the great silent majority, never venturing an opinion, and you will be safe in the knowledge that you won't get it wrong.   Or you can endeavour to help others out with reasonably well-informed opinion, but with the certain knowledge that you will occasionally get it wrong.   I know which I prefer.

Of course there are some of us who seem to specialize in getting it wrong, but you don't seem to have achieved that status, at least not yet.

... and do you know that it takes only 17 muscles to smile, but 42 to frown.

... and wasn't Joan Baez wonderful on Martin Scorsese's brilliant profile of Bob Dylan No Direction Home, broadcast here on BBC2 on Monday and yesterday?   What a lovely lady, obviously still very much in love with Dylan.    I had almost forgotten what a huge impact he had on my generation.

So, please keep making the mistakes.   It just proves you are human.

Bernard C.  8)
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Offline Glen

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Translating glass terms
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2005, 08:02:53 AM »
Bernard wrote:
Quote
So, please keep making the mistakes. It just proves you are human


I would amend it somewhat (whilst agreeing with everything else Bernard said). I actually think you are amazing! Your skill with languages stuns me. Your incredible knowledge of glass is phenomenal. And most of all, you take time to help others.

If I wrote any more I might be accused of trying to start a Fan Club  :lol:  But hey, I'll be Member No. 1.

Thank you for all you do.

Glen
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Offline Leni

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Translating glass terms
« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2005, 09:05:34 AM »
Quote from: "Bernard C"
Marcus — Thanks for making me smile.

Me too  :D
Quote
Of course there are some of us who seem to specialize in getting it wrong,

:oops: :oops: :oops: You got me 'bang to rights' Guv :oops: :oops: :oops:
Quote
... and wasn't Joan Baez wonderful on Martin Scorsese's brilliant profile of Bob Dylan No Direction Home, broadcast here on BBC2 on Monday and yesterday?   What a lovely lady, obviously still very much in love with Dylan.    I had almost forgotten what a huge impact he had on my generation.

Fantastically beautiful still, sounding as wonderful still, wholehearted believer in what she always stood for - still!  (Unlike Dyan, IMNSHO :evil: )

And wasn't Marsha Hunt wonderful in the program about her battle with breast cancer?  What is it about the beautiful women of that generation?   :?  Why didn't I wear as well as them?   :(  What have I been doing wrong?  :cry:

But enough of this!

Marcus, Bernard; Please don't ever stop risking being wrong!    :shock:

You are so knowledgeable, and you get it right so often, that (especially for a total 'div' like me  :oops: ) it would be churlish even to mention the occasional    slip!  :shock:  :roll:

Leni
Leni


Offline Max

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Translating glass terms
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2005, 10:55:26 AM »
Leni said:
Quote
especially for a total 'div' like me


Prunting frits Leni!  Lovejoy was a div, and if it's good enough for him....  :wink:  :roll:  :lol:

Let's celebrate our divviness!  
I am not a man


Offline Leni

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Translating glass terms
« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2005, 11:40:07 AM »
Quote from: "Max"
Lovejoy was a div, and if it's good enough for him....  :wink:  :roll:  :lol:

Let's celebrate our divviness!  

Thanks, Max, but Lovejoy meant diviner - I meant divot! :oops:   :(  :roll:

Leni
Leni


Sklounion

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Translating glass terms
« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2005, 09:56:43 PM »
Bernard, Glen, Leni, Max,
 
I admit to being fallible, and your comments are too generous. I am  humbled by, and grateful for, your friendship.

Thank you,

Marcus


Offline Frank

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Translating glass terms
« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2005, 08:47:55 PM »
Strange that as I read this a 1929 French catalogue lies on my desk open to a page including mirrors all called Glace.

How about this though Coupe a Glace, verrerie irrisée de Bohême?

More puzzling it includes glass by Muller, Schneider all described as Pate de Verre :?:

I have mistakes in print too!
Frank A.
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Offline Frank

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Translating glass terms
« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2006, 03:10:13 PM »
So what does Pate de Verre refer to in French?
Frank A.
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Offline Glen

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Translating glass terms
« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2006, 03:23:36 PM »
Quote from: "Frank"
So what does Pate de Verre refer to in French?


I don't know exactly what it is, but I am sure I saw a little pot of it in Waitrose earlier today.

 :lol:
Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood

 



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