Author Topic: Can't identify bowl for certain, maybe Northwood, maybe not  (Read 1306 times)

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Offline Red Eagle

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Can't identify bowl for certain, maybe Northwood, maybe not
« on: September 29, 2005, 05:10:18 AM »
I have a ruffled bowl, marigold, on a 2 1/2 inch  diameter round base. The edge of the bowl is peaked every  2 inches. It is 6 1/2 inches wide and 2  1/4 inches high. The interior surface is stippled. The outer surface has two bands, 3/4 inches in width. Each band appears to be vines centered between two cables, the design angled to the left. There is no maker's mark on the piece. I suspect this may be reproduction or a fake because there are several small bubbles (if you look carefully) in the glass at different places. There is also a mold line visible on the outer surface. Any help would be appreciated as I have not been able to find this piece or anything like it. :roll:


Mod: Pictures gone, see here for examples of  scale band and stippled rays.
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Offline Glen

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Can't identify bowl for certain, maybe Northwood, maybe not
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2005, 07:49:07 AM »
It's a Fenton piece and it's not a repro, it's genuine old Classic Carnival.

There are two patterns, as you have noted. The interior is "Stippled Rays". The exterior is a seldom seen pattern called "Scale Band".

"Scale Band" is also found on water sets (again not often).

Possibly the most interesting aspect of your bowl is the edge that you clearly described as "peaked every two inches". Now I have a visual, your description is clear. This is an edge that shrieks Fenton and can be used to identify their glass - I call it a bracket edge.

It's a pretty item.

Glen
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Offline Red Eagle

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Can't identify bowl for certain, maybe Northwood, maybe not
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2005, 12:06:45 PM »
Glen, thanks for the rapid reply! Now I can sleep at night, my dilemma being resolved!
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Offline Glen

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Can't identify bowl for certain, maybe Northwood, maybe not
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2005, 03:38:29 PM »
The colour of the bowl is intriguing. As Carnival Glass is notoriously difficult to photograph, I was assuming that the bowl was quite possibly marigold and had just photographed oddly, with a pinkish cast. It crossed my mind that it might even be red, but it's just not deep or dark enough, and I am sure I can see a more typical orangey colouring and iridescence. So perhaps what we should ask if is it possible for you, Red Eagle, to take another photo sometime, perhaps in natural light outside? That should help us to be more certain of the colour.

Marigold Carnival is clear glass that has been iridised with a "marigold" spray. To be marigold, it must be on clear base glass. Anything else, and it is not strictly marigold.

To see and determine the base color (which is, in all but two main instances, the colour by which the Carnival is actually known**) try and locate a part of the item which is not iridised. On a bowl or plate, this will usually be on the collar base. If you then hold the piece up to the light you should be able to see the base glass colour.

** I said there were two main instances where the base glass colour does not determine the name/colour. One is MARIGOLD and the other is SMOKE. In these two instances the base glass is clear and the iridescence is what determines the colour.

Pink Carnival is a rare colour in old, classic Carnival Glass. Fenton made some extremely rare examples (on the Holly compote for example) and Dugan-Diamond made a pink in their Afterglow range - but again it is very seldom seen. The maker who produced the most pink Carnival was Riihimaki. A touch of selenium in the batch gave it a distinctive pink colour. Note that the iridescence is marigold though, so it's not always easy to spot at first glance.

In old Classic Carnival it would be called pink Carnival really. Though the Dugan-Diamond version is Afterglow pink (great name!). Riihimaki's pink has been referred to as Rio pink. It can also be called marigold on pink base glass - for absolute precision.

There is clear Carnival too. It would have a pastel, almost clear iridescence. White carnival is different again as it is acid etched/obscured. There are many colours in Classic old Carnival (I've identified more than 60). If you add modern Carnival too, the number would go through the roof.

Contemporary Carnival can be found much more easily in pink. Boyd, Smith, Fenton and Imperial have all made plenty of it. The various modern makers have their own trade names for pinks.

I am certainly aware of some glass that has been found with Beverly Crystal - Poland stickers, in a Golden Cherub design. I am not aware of repro as in fake "old" carnival from Poland.

Very likely, though, there is iridised, press moulded glass being made in Eastern Europe. I know Zabowice has done some.

I am not sure if I have covered all the questions here - it's a huge topic. Colour is possibly the most widely discussed and most hotly disputed area of Carnival (IMHO).
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Offline Red Eagle

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Can't identify bowl for certain, maybe Northwood, maybe not
« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2005, 04:57:30 PM »
First, let me express my sincerest appreciation for the attention my little bowl has garnered! This little jewel belonged to my wife's aunt who married in 1930 or so and has been in family ever sense where I think now it will remain.  

The weather here has been dark and overcast for several days but today was a little better. I reshot the bowl to perhaps make the color more evident. Natural light does make a major difference. I am aslo sending a image of a another strange little bowl that I cannot identify and would appreciate your opinion. This little bowl does not have a pattern on the interior.

http://tinypic.com/e85r47.jpg

http://tinypic.com/e85sog.jpg

http://tinypic.com/e85t10.jpg

http://tinypic.com/e85teu.jpg
ive away a smile a day! After all they are free!


Offline Glen

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Can't identify bowl for certain, maybe Northwood, maybe not
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2005, 07:00:08 AM »
Red Eagle (love that name!) many thanks for the new photos. Your Carnival "Scale Band/Stippled Rays" bowl is a gorgeous marigold. The new photos really do show the marigold coloring well - many thanks for taking the time to take them and confirm the color.

Your other mystery piece is a lot more recent in manufacture. It's an Indiana Glass (Dunkirk, Indiana) piece and is Contemporary Carnival, dating from circa the 1970s. The pattern is known as "Pineapple and Floral" (aka Indiana pattern #618). The color is Indiana's Iridescent Gold.

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood


 



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