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Author Topic: Name that horse, please - rearing horse, bookend?  (Read 1476 times)

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Offline TxSilver

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Re: Name that horse, please
« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2009, 07:30:52 PM »
There are four characteristics of Ivo's horse that jumped out at me -- the noble position of the head, the tight mane, the long tail, and most of all, the slab-like base. Most of the common American pressed horse bookends have vertical development of the base. The Fostoria horse seems to have greater development of the back legs. The thick hooves give a look of real substance. Ivo's horse looks more like crystal than the horses by Smith, etc., do. IMO, it is a magnificent horse.
Anita
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Offline deco.queen

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Re: Name that horse, please
« Reply #11 on: March 09, 2009, 07:39:42 PM »
Frank,
I'm sending you a scanned page from Glass Animals that compares them.
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Offline Frank

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Re: Name that horse, please
« Reply #12 on: March 09, 2009, 08:05:40 PM »
They must all have a common root as they are so similar and are also found in metal and ceramics. I have had US base metal one that dated to the 30s and a german ceramic one that dated to 1920s-1952 latest.
Frank A.
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Offline Ivo

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Re: Name that horse, please
« Reply #13 on: March 09, 2009, 08:23:59 PM »
I was thinking the same thing. Somewhere there must have been a sculptor who made a masterful sculpture of a bolting horse - which was turned into bookends, losing definition and force with every new round of spinnoffs. Mine seems to be from a pretty good stable, seeing it still has both its eyes - but some pictures I see are of shocking quality.  I find it also strange to find American glass from the 1940s on a market in Holland.... but then, strange things will happen.

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Offline Ivo

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Re: Name that horse, please
« Reply #14 on: March 13, 2009, 12:42:20 PM »

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Offline Ohio

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Re: Name that horse, please
« Reply #15 on: March 15, 2009, 07:14:21 AM »
That one is credited to Mario Petrucci by the Museum of Industrial Arts Prague & they were also made by the Paden City Glass Company in WV (USA) from a mold leased from the Barth Art Glass Company also located in Paden City so there are obviously several molds.   

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Offline NKP

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Re: Name that horse, please
« Reply #16 on: July 25, 2009, 12:12:13 PM »
(http://www.debook.com/animal/components/com_virtuemart/shop_image/product/cb040511ce439532b3e90605e16cd812.jpg)
ex Glass Zoo

The similarities to the coarser 1940s L E Smith (US) horse book end are remarkable, this is more likely to pre-date that. Further research needed.

Mary Pelt attributes to Libochovice1937 #39 on page 16 here

Sizes: 215mm (8½") high

Marcus to 'possibly'  Jablonex, Czechoslovakia 1948-92.

I just bought this single bookend which most resembles the above picture - a 4.5 cm. high satinated base - however the position of the legs seems different, being more horizontal than all the others I have seen.

Any thoughts ?


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