Author Topic: Yet another old English expert required!  (Read 733 times)

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Offline keith

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Yet another old English expert required!
« on: August 29, 2009, 03:37:28 PM »
Is this an English Georgian custard cup?the handle lost its little curl at the bottom and has been polished to take away the rough edge,I only paid £3 because of the damage so no real loss if it isn't,Keith


Offline Carolyn Preston

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Re: Yet another old English expert required!
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2009, 05:35:41 PM »
I'm not even vaguely an expert in anything glass, but it kinda looks like a punch bowl cup.  :huh:

Carolyn


Offline oldglassman

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Re: Yet another old English expert required!
« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2009, 09:25:37 AM »
Hi ,
         English , probably , georgian probably not , it looks more like mid to late 19thc to me , and could have been used for punch or jelly,

Peter.


Offline Ming

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Re: Yet another old English expert required!
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2009, 02:40:54 PM »
No l don't think it is 19thc . I would think it a punch glass from around Edwardian period. The colour and base shown definitely not that old.
Never walk away from a bargain


Offline keith

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Re: Yet another old English expert required!
« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2009, 03:30:47 PM »
From a 'Brummie',thanks for reply, the cup has a lot of wear that is difficult to see on the pic' and is 'cut glass'Keith.

Offline Ming

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Re: Yet another old English expert required!
« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2009, 12:46:51 AM »
Keith
Ewardian period means nearly 100 years old you know. Beside your glass has a flat base therefore you will notice more wear anyway. If you think it is very old have you find bits and pieces in the metal. Even grey colour glass only means it was made before 1920. If it was Georgian then it would not has flat base and have sort  of oily feel to it.
Never walk away from a bargain

Offline keith

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Re: Yet another old English expert required!
« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2009, 11:38:05 AM »
Ok,thanks,it seems none of what I have in the collection is more than 140-150 years old,I'll keep looking and maybe pop to London and get me an Egyptian core formed fish,I'm sure they're old!ta,Keith.

Offline oldglassman

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Re: Yet another old English expert required!
« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2009, 12:50:14 PM »
If you think it is very old have you find bits and pieces in the metal.

Hi , I think this quote is a little misleading , yes finding bits and pieces in the metal can be an indication of its age but should not be relied upon ,this would depend on the quality of the metal and the objects being produced , i have in my collection many glasses from the early 18thc and the 17thc , made form very fine metal both lead and soda that are as clear and imperfection free as any later produced glass , the quality of the metal  is what determines whether an early produced glass can be called a very fine specimine or a run of the mill glass produced for the mass market , many items were produced for the very top of the market using the finest metals and in the hands of the best blowers have produced some of the finest glasswares known , these being the most desireable to modern day collectors of early glass , and as such will command the highest of prices , ie a heavy baluster glass of lesser metal and made by a less competent hand will be valued far lower that a glass made from the finest metals pruduced by the highest skilled blowers.
  I can also add that a flat polished foot though not common can also be found in very early glass ,I have seen and owned a few large early 18th glasses with very large thick feet that have been flat ground possibly due to the large size of the pontil resulting in a rocking glass,these being produced before the norm of polishing out pontils leaving a coin polish mark,

Having said all that though I am not trying to argue that your glass is any earlier , i would still say that it is more than likely late 19thc , or as Ming says possibly edwardian .
   Hope i havn't rambled on too much

cheers ,
 Peter.

Offline keith

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Re: Yet another old English expert required!
« Reply #8 on: September 11, 2009, 03:43:18 PM »
All info is gratefully received,Keith.

Offline Ming

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Re: Yet another old English expert required!
« Reply #9 on: September 12, 2009, 02:50:57 PM »
I know what you mean, Peter.
But remember those top quality glass you mentioned would not be plain. It would had some sort of fancy engrave on it just like in the Museum piece. This is not what you find in car boot or charity shop or what l called everyday glass.
If you have handled enough glass you almost know whether it is old or not in most cases.
Never walk away from a bargain

 

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