Author Topic: Murano 1930s / 50s ?  (Read 1221 times)

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Offline David555

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Murano 1930s / 50s ?
« on: October 15, 2005, 01:53:26 AM »
Bought this today

I am sure it's a bit of Murano by a good maker - it sings out with quality

7.5" high with a aventurine in all the right places mmmmmm

I will let the picture do the talking as older Italian glass is a weaker field for me than 60s / 70s

http://publish.hometown.aol.co.uk/blackcatgla/images/italian%201.jpg

Adam D555 :twisted:  :twisted:

Thanks
David is my Father's name, 555 is the number of man ('The Pixies'), but please call me ADAM P.


Offline chuggy

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Murano 1930s / 50s ?
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2005, 06:48:54 AM »
Nice one Adam, I particularly like to colour combination makes a nice change without the ruby red included. Shape and handles are typically pre-war Salviati, late 1920's early 30's.
Paul
There is no distance on earth as far away as yesterday.


Anonymous

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Murano 1930s / 50s ?
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2005, 04:52:09 PM »
Hi,

Very pretty!

While Salviati is a possibility, this form is extremely common, and was definitely made by many companies and over several decades. The vase could have been made anywhere from 1930 to 1970.  There are so many of this type of vase around that it is possible that similar items are still made today.


Offline David555

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Murano 1930s / 50s ?
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2005, 07:39:23 PM »
Thanks Guys

Chuggy (Paul) I will look into Salviati

Guest - I know what you mean, but I bought some bits from an old lady last week (house clearance) - some Loetz/Kralik and Powell 1930s and she remembers her mother having this vase way back along with the other items so I think it is pre-war, I don't think she would lie to me, everything I got from her was 1930s - I also bought some similar Italian bowls with same decoration

I am looking at the aventurine and I have become quite good at telling the older from the new, it's very similar to Monart/Vasart aventurine and seems to be richer and have a more coppery tone than the newer pieces with aventurine in them from Italy - also like with my old bits of Monart/Vasart there are carbon (I thinks that’s what it is) flakes and dots here and there , I mean maybe three or so - I don't see that in the modern pieces I have or when I am looking in the gift shops when in Milan or Venice - I think like with older Belleek (has tiny pieces of carbon) it's a kind of indicator if you know what I mean, excusing the cross referencing to make my point - slight imperfections go well with age, newer processes mean thinner, clearer glass with few bubbles, all shiny and new looking

It may just be me, something I see - but I have a good sense (I don't think she had boxes of glass with a 'Made in Hong Kong' (or Murano 2005 label in her bathroom  LOL

Adam D555 :twisted:  :twisted:
David is my Father's name, 555 is the number of man ('The Pixies'), but please call me ADAM P.


Offline Frank

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Murano 1930s / 50s ?
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2005, 07:52:06 PM »
Don't read too much in the colour of aventurine. Paul Ysart bought for Moncrieff in Paris and used a variety of colours. You find one or two golds in Monart, along with, rarely, red, blue and green aventurine.

It is of course made by several firms and there is inevitably a huge variety of shades particularly in gold/copper/bronze/brass shades. Unlike old brass where it is possible to tell the difference in age by the formulations - older brass had moe copper and hence a richer/warmer colour - modern brass, say 1950 on, uses progressively less. I suspect partly due to the high cost of copper but also due to a desire to create an alloy that was more gold-like in colour and less prone to oxidation. Aventurine is made chemically so the end colour would vary a little by batch and more by maker.

Someone did do in depth research on Aventurine - possibly Sibylle Jargstorf.
Frank A.
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Offline David555

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Murano 1930s / 50s ?
« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2005, 11:54:53 PM »
Hi Frank

Dash it!! there goes my mmmm I can tell it's age by the colour of the aventurine line party piece

It sounds like you could Frank, that's a lot of very useful information

I was on uneasy ground comparing Ysart to Italian aventurine, but at least it brought you into the thread!

What do you think of my vase? it has that warm brass in the aventurine, the flash of the photo makes it look brighter than it is, could this be due to more copper as you say, comparing the aventurine to 1970s Murano bits I have which are really quite bright gold as you say I feel it indicates along with other elements an older piece

Anyway, what am I talking about Mrs Mac is a good friend and has a house full of lovely old stuff - Frank I live in Hyndland, West End of Glasgow - some of the older houses are choc full of the rarest Monart, Clutha, etc. I believe one of the foremost collectors lives not that far from me in Kingsborough Gardens, I think .... my glass dealer is always going on about him LOL

http://hometown.aol.co.uk/blackcatgla/images/image_2.jpg

Adam D555 :twisted:  :twisted:
David is my Father's name, 555 is the number of man ('The Pixies'), but please call me ADAM P.


 

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