Author Topic: a little bohemian mystery  (Read 4417 times)

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Offline krsilber

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Re: a little bohemian mystery
« Reply #40 on: September 11, 2009, 12:15:08 AM »
"Balance of probabilities" - I like that!  So much of glass attribution is based on it.  It can be awfully frustrating for someone like me, who likes cold hard facts and is habitually overly skeptical (though neither stops me from positing some pretty wild hypotheses!).

"for me at least, the sense of discovery is still great fun"  - yes indeedy! 
Kristi


"The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science."

- Albert Einstein


Offline azelismia

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Re: a little bohemian mystery
« Reply #41 on: December 22, 2012, 03:06:23 AM »
to go back to tischer a little. Tischer also marked ceramics. They were almost certainly an export firm. I don't think they were doing decorating in Karlsbad, I think they were exporting from there. Some of it is quite clearly marked in the Moser fashion, Some of it quite clearly in Harrach. I think I've seen some that are documented decoration from Heckert (who was often sourced from Harrach as well)



Offline krsilber

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Re: a little bohemian mystery
« Reply #42 on: December 22, 2012, 05:10:32 AM »
I think these are a couple pieces produced en masse for the export/tourist? market, done entirely by Moser in the style of Harrach, Josephinenhuette, etc., capitalizing on demand.  Small and inexpensive mimics, if you will.  Someone mentioned they're slightly different, and that's true, more so than you would expect of natural variation by one person.  Look at the difference in the way the stems intertwine near the bottom - one vase is done clearly (over-under-over), the other is fudged.  Lack of quality control.

When I saw the label this time, the first thing I thought is, hey!  It's dated!  Could the 7/22 be month and year?  I think they could easily be later than turn-of-the-century. 

One thing I was very keen to observe when visiting the Passau Museum was the verity of the generalization that Harrach had the color on the bottom, and Moser on the top.  My impression is that it may be a trend, but it's far from universal.
Kristi


"The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science."

- Albert Einstein


Offline Galle

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Re: a little bohemian mystery
« Reply #43 on: December 22, 2012, 06:03:23 AM »
I think it's more accurate to say that Tischer was a refiner of both glass and ceramics.


Offline azelismia

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Re: a little bohemian mystery
« Reply #44 on: December 22, 2012, 12:15:24 PM »
I am not sure they were a refiner. It could be either way I think.


Offline flying free

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Re: a little bohemian mystery
« Reply #45 on: January 07, 2013, 05:01:54 PM »
I have a question. 
Am I reading this right that this hasn't been definitely confirmed as Moser?

I'm trying to identify an iridescent cabinet vase that where the surface iridescence appears to be identical to Fritz Heckert iridescent vases.  Mine is not enamelled just plain.  In the course of my searches I came across this vase (see link)  on Collectors Weekly identified as Moser.  It has a very similar iridescent surface finish to mine, hence my interest. 
I found it difficult to read the mark but it looks like it could read 'GLASFABRIK KARLSBAD'  (please correct me if I'm wrong).  Is this an identified mark for Moser please?
Edited later to add that I've enlarged the mark on the Collectors Weekly vasek and have found it confirmed as a Moser mark on the Great Glass site.

I'm just wondering where the blank vase on the Collector's Weekly site originated if so - I'm wondering if the enamelling is Moser but the blank not?
http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stories/64363-moser-egyptian-vase

Many thanks
m




Offline azelismia

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Re: a little bohemian mystery
« Reply #46 on: January 11, 2013, 06:12:24 AM »
That piece from CW is mine. The mark is absolutely guaranteed  Moser.  there is an M on either side of the goblet in the circle, dated from 1898-1919. The marks are shown in the second Truitt book at the back of the book.
Because of the dating of this piece (based on when truitts say that mark was used) this was glass produced by Moser.


Josephinenhutte had a line with the cyprus iridescent based on Roman shapes. is it maybe that?

http://www.thegildedcurio.com/item-440.html



Offline flying free

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Re: a little bohemian mystery
« Reply #47 on: January 11, 2013, 08:48:40 AM »
Alisa I didn't realise that if it had the mark on it meant it was definitely Moser made glass, so thank you  :)
I have been investigating Josephinenhutte and Fritz Heckert but so far I've not found a match.  Mind you I don't have the books either yet  ;D


regarding the Tischer discussion I came across this the other day but couldn't remember which thread the discussion was in.  It's marked in a very detailed way on the base with what I think is a Tischer stamp and also enamelled letters and numbers.-

http://www.ebay.com/itm/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=251208970593&item=251208970593&lgeo=1&vectorid=229466

m


Offline azelismia

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Re: a little bohemian mystery
« Reply #48 on: January 11, 2013, 09:57:53 AM »
Moser made their own glass after 1895 I think it was. So if a mark is dated to after that period it's pretty certain that the glass was made by moser.


Offline flying free

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Re: a little bohemian mystery
« Reply #49 on: January 11, 2013, 11:03:56 AM »
Thanks - I was just curious because I also assumed that Fritz Heckert made their own glass after their own furnace was built, but
 I have been reading that Harrach was supplying glass to other manufacturers as I understand it? 
Therefore I guess I didn't want to assume that a manufacturer only used their own blanks even though they had their own furnaces. 
So in the example I gave of Fritz Heckert I wondered if they had continued to use Josephinenhutte blanks to back up their production for example, although that is pure speculation as I haven't read anywhere that happened, and Fritz Heckert were clearly a huge concern.  But then so were Legras in France and it is in conjunction with them that I've read Harrach may have been supplying glass to them.

And in fact I've just had a Harrach vase confirmed by Harrach but apparently it was produced for another company, which I believe from my research was a manufacturer.  I've not had time to delve into that yet though.

m



 

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