Author Topic: Letters on my glass - DRGM - 'tis a Mystery  (Read 7651 times)

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Offline pamela

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Letters on my glass - 'tis a Mystery
« Reply #20 on: November 08, 2005, 08:09:06 PM »
Glen, what a beautiful item - thank you for sharing it with us  :D

Ivo named it stove and that is the North German word Stövchen (Stoevchen) which is diminuating a stove  by '-chen' to a small one.

Yours is the one and only I ever saw in Carnival glass.

I have got two in pink:
one is Brockwitz 1936 Tafel 90 Teewärmer - neither DRGM nor any other mark

the other one is Stölzle Oberglas marked OG

both have that small 'Waxine' pressed glass item for the candle

three further pink items are 'food warmers' - Speisenwärmer oval shaped with two lights: one Brockwitz (unmarked) and two Stölzle (marked)

(I shall hurry up to upload them on www.pressglas-pavillon.de - do not know where the photos vanished  :roll:  )

Pattern: Yours really looks Rindskopf!

Reading PK 2002-3, 2002-5 and 2003-1 and the forewords of SG to the Rindskopf Musterbücher I'd like to post here:
1) Rindskopf collapsed in 1927 - there is also a MB for 1934 - could mean: still working for others
2) INWALD bought at least part of Rindskopf in ca. 1936
Please look there also: Inwald 1928 Tafel 82 ff. 'Service ohne Namen' (set without name) and Tafel 117 Russische Steinel (Russian stones/diamonds) On the latter you see a STÖVCHEN 8631 to the lower left!
3) an important share of iridisized glass from these manufacturers was exported to England
4) Investigating DRGM in PK, mainly contributions of Arnold Becker www.pressglas.de , I was not very successful I'm afraid and nothing to trans -late -port here
5)Do you remember the great singer Sam Cooke - he sung :
I don't know about HISTORY, I don't know Trigonometry......science book...French I took...what a wonderful world this could be! (or similar  :oops:  )
Best wishes!
Pamela
http://www.pressglas-pavillon.de
http://www.glas-musterbuch.de

Experience teaches that anyone who begins to collect in any field can feel a change in his soul. He becomes a joyful man filled with a deeper empathy, and a more open understanding of worldly things moves his soul.    (Alfred Lichtwark 1852 – 1914)


Offline pamela

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Letters on my glass - 'tis a Mystery
« Reply #21 on: November 08, 2005, 08:15:26 PM »
Ohh, I forgot to mention:
IMHO your DRGM patented the PATTERN, not the shape or usage!  :lol:
Pamela
http://www.pressglas-pavillon.de
http://www.glas-musterbuch.de

Experience teaches that anyone who begins to collect in any field can feel a change in his soul. He becomes a joyful man filled with a deeper empathy, and a more open understanding of worldly things moves his soul.    (Alfred Lichtwark 1852 – 1914)


Offline Glen

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Letters on my glass - 'tis a Mystery
« Reply #22 on: November 09, 2005, 10:36:39 AM »
Pamela  - thank you very much for your interesting comments about your tea warmers (stövchen). I will look forward to seeing your photos of them.

I note the Inwald tea warmer you mentioned. It can be seen in Heacock's Collecting Glass Vol 3. 1986. Page 78, table 117. There is another one shown in the same 1986  volume which is surely the one Ivo's grandmother had - Jacobean pattern, page 74, table 99.

I must admit to being a little confused about your notes regarding Rindskopf and your references to PK 2002 and 2003. The discovery of Rindskopf as a major manufacturer of Carnival Glass was mine (2000). First published in our A Century of Carnival Glass (Schiffer 2001, though actually released late 2000). Also recorded in various Carnival Glass journals in 2001; further information in Czechoslovakian Carnival Part One: Inwald & Rindskopf (Thistlewood, 2002) and updated to include much photographic evidence about the Rindskopf factory on my website here > http://www.geocities.com/carni_glass_uk_2000/RindskopfHome.html

And in your point 3 you wrote "an important share of iridised glass from these manufacturers was exported to England" Yes, I know that. The research is mine. I have documented it, written about it and lectured on it.

Czech Carnival (from both Rindskopf and Inwald) is found in the UK, mainland Europe (Belgium and France have produced some great items) the USA, Australia and South America.

Interestingly, the "Inverted Prisms" tea warmer that is the subject of this thread, was actually found in Oklahoma, USA (I purchased it from there). I have since discovered that another one (without the metal top) was found in Pennsylvania, USA. I am not aware of any tea warmers being found in the United Kingdom.

I'm glad you agree with me that my tea warmer looks like Rindskopf. It is undoubtedly theirs, in my opinion. However I must disagree with you regarding your final comment in which you noted that "IMHO your DRGM patented the PATTERN, not the shape or usage". That doesn't follow to me. Why would only this shape have the DRGM on? No other items that I am aware of in Rindskopf's "Inverted Prisms" pattern have DRGM on them. If the patent was for the pattern then it would be on other shapes in the "Inverted Prisms" range - and it isn't. In fact I am not aware of any other Carnival items from Rindskopf (or anyone else) that bears the DRGM. The only two pieces I know of are the two tea warmers. So, at the moment, my feelings are that the patent applies to the shape (and not the "Inverted Prisms" pattern).

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood


Offline Glen

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Letters on my glass - 'tis a Mystery
« Reply #23 on: November 09, 2005, 01:59:19 PM »
A bit of further information on Inwald's Jacobean range - and what was selected for import (and production) in England.

I've been looking through a pamphlet that shows the huge range of Jacobean glass items that were on sale in the UK at the zenith of the pattern's popularity. Seems there were around 300 shapes on offer, including curiosities such as toothbrush racks, cocktail shakers and chubby sugar sifters (not sure if that referred to the user or the shape  :shock: ). Yet there is not a tea warmer in sight. (I wonder why the British didn't... still don't... use them?)

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood


Offline Frank

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Letters on my glass - 'tis a Mystery
« Reply #24 on: November 09, 2005, 03:19:42 PM »
Quote from: "Glen"
(I wonder why the British didn't... still don't... use them?)Glen


Gran used a trivet, hooked on the front of an open fire, for the kettle to boil up and then teapot to stay hot.

Mother used a tea-cosy.
Frank A.
Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
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Offline Glen

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Letters on my glass - 'tis a Mystery
« Reply #25 on: November 09, 2005, 03:50:25 PM »
Frank - yes - a teacosy. Of course. As teabags rule in so many households today, I wonder how many people actually still use teacosies?

Another "wondering" I have had is this one: how many of these glass tea warmers must have broken with the heat or with the weight (of the pot)? A related Carnival Glass item is the Candle Lamp (Northwood made a fabulous one in their "Grape & Cable" pattern). It consisted of a candlestick (in which one inserted a wax candle) and a metal fitment that supported a glass shade above the flame. It's a rare item today, no doubt because many must have been broken in use.

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood


Offline Frank

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Letters on my glass - 'tis a Mystery
« Reply #26 on: November 09, 2005, 04:08:47 PM »
All of the pressed glass candlesticks that I have owned got cracked through use. Again I got lots in my shop in the 80's but they sold for peanuts so I kept them as I used loads of candles. Somewhere I still have a pair but cracked. I presume these would be collectable nowadays.
Frank A.
Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
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Offline Glen

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Letters on my glass - 'tis a Mystery
« Reply #27 on: November 09, 2005, 04:32:43 PM »
One of the most beautiful candlesticks I've ever seen is the iridised (marigold Carnival) Jesus candlestick by Brockwitz.

http://tinypic.com/fjl0js.jpg

And as an aside, re. the Grape and Cable candlelamp I mentioned, the candlesticks in the pattern are hard to find. But the glass shades are really hard to find. I imagine that having the flame right alongside them must have been a real problem!

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood


Offline pamela

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Letters on my glass - 'tis a Mystery
« Reply #28 on: November 09, 2005, 07:29:33 PM »
Glen, my sincere apologies: I could not read from SG's PK that all this knowledge originates from your side - a real mess: I tried to translate you back to English... Do not understand why in his PK he is not clearly citing you but issued it as his own knowledge?! :(
Again: I feel very sorry!
Pamela
Pamela
http://www.pressglas-pavillon.de
http://www.glas-musterbuch.de

Experience teaches that anyone who begins to collect in any field can feel a change in his soul. He becomes a joyful man filled with a deeper empathy, and a more open understanding of worldly things moves his soul.    (Alfred Lichtwark 1852 – 1914)


Offline Glen

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Letters on my glass - 'tis a Mystery
« Reply #29 on: November 09, 2005, 07:36:36 PM »
Oh Pamela, no need to be sorry. I just wanted to let you know. That's all  :D

I wish I could read German (I truly admire your ability to read English). I can see that Seigmar does note, as references, our "Century of Carnival" and the Czech Special. I corresponded with Siegmar and Bob Smith (my co-researcher) over many months. It's a long story, and for me it was a fascinating time. I likened it, at the time, as if I was walking on fresh white snow. The discovery that Rindskopf was a major Carnival producer was sensational.

Thanks again for all your help.

And a PS. The song you quoted by Sam Cooke..... is soooo good. My all time favourite rendition of it is in the film "Witness". Simply wonderful.
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood

 

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