Author Topic: Letters on my glass - DRGM - 'tis a Mystery  (Read 6900 times)

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Offline pamela

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Letters on my glass - 'tis a Mystery
« Reply #10 on: October 22, 2005, 04:52:29 PM »
Gebrauch - use
Muster - depends: can be sample or pattern 
gesetzlich - by law
geschützt - in this case copyright

schützen is a verb - to shelter, to protect
the noun is 'Schutz'

also animals and plants may be 'geschützt'

Glen you will find more information regarding DRGM in Pressglas-Korrespondenz - Arnold Becker, Berlin investigated a lot on this subject. Just indicate here issue of interest and I will be happy to try to translate!

Looking very much forward to your pictures!
Pamela
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Offline Glen

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Letters on my glass - 'tis a Mystery
« Reply #11 on: October 22, 2005, 06:04:22 PM »
Pamela - many thanks. I understand now that it is a German Patent Design. That makes good sense as it is such an unusual item to find in glass (and a complex mould).

Thank you for your offer to translate (re PK). The problem is I am not really sure where to begin  :oops:

The main thing I want to discover is who made the mould. Rindskopf in Czechoslovakia (using a German Registered Patent) or perhaps Brockwitz or another mould maker in Germany (who had registered and held the patent). I am not sure if it is possible to discover that.

Thank you again.

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
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Copyright G&S Thistlewood


Offline pamela

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Letters on my glass - 'tis a Mystery
« Reply #12 on: November 02, 2005, 09:06:16 PM »
Glen, perhaps it is only me who is interested, but would you be so kind to issue a photo of the DRGM item in question please?
Thank you!
BW PW
Pamela
http://www.pressglas-pavillon.de
http://www.glas-musterbuch.de

Experience teaches that anyone who begins to collect in any field can feel a change in his soul. He becomes a joyful man filled with a deeper empathy, and a more open understanding of worldly things moves his soul.    (Alfred Lichtwark 1852 – 1914)


Offline Glen

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Letters on my glass - 'tis a Mystery
« Reply #13 on: November 02, 2005, 09:57:19 PM »
Pamela - yes I will be doing that shortly. Steve plans to take photos of the item and we will be writing a short feature on it as it is a most unusual piece of glass. We haven't had time to take the photos yet (life is a little bit pressured at the moment) but hope to get it done soon.

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
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Copyright G&S Thistlewood


Offline Glen

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Letters on my glass - 'tis a Mystery
« Reply #14 on: November 06, 2005, 08:39:29 PM »
Pamela - Steve has taken a host of photos of the piece. I hope to resize and post them all in an article about the piece tomorrow. Meanwhile here are two quick images of the letters moulded onto the base of the item.

http://tinypic.com/fdgap4.jpg

http://tinypic.com/fdgdoj.jpg

More very soon.

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
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Offline Glen

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Letters on my glass - 'tis a Mystery
« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2005, 05:39:59 PM »
Pamela....I've done it at last  :D

The article is here
http://www.geocities.com/carni_glass_uk_2000/Tea.html
You can also access it directly from my website.

Thank you Pamela, and Frank and Ivo for your help with the DRGM letters. I have acknowledged your wonderful assistance at the foot of the article.

Can anyone tell me if they have seen an item like this before? Iridised or not.

I believe they are called stovchen today.

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood


Connie

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Letters on my glass - 'tis a Mystery
« Reply #16 on: November 08, 2005, 10:08:31 AM »
Great article, Glen.  I really enjoyed it.


Offline Anne

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Letters on my glass - 'tis a Mystery
« Reply #17 on: November 08, 2005, 01:51:26 PM »
Fascinating, thank you Glen. I hadn't realised pot warmers were as old as this. I have two of the modern clear glass ones and t'other Anne (I think?) has one as well...  but they're nowhere near as snazzy as the Carnival ones! 
http://yobunny.org.uk/gallery1/displayimage.php?pos=-187
http://yobunny.org.uk/gallery1/displayimage.php?pos=-188


Offline Ivo

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Letters on my glass - 'tis a Mystery
« Reply #18 on: November 08, 2005, 02:22:12 PM »
Quote from: "Glen"

Can anyone tell me if they have seen an item like this before? Iridised or not.
I believe they are called stovchen today.
Glen


Those are a very familiar sight in this country, it used to be an essential piece of household glass - the tea stove.

"Waxine" candles (from "wax"and paraffine" were introduced in Holland by Ericus Gerhardus Verkade.  He bought the patent from his son in law, the briton Morris Fowler. Verkade started production of small paraffin candles in 1898. Initial sales were not brilliant, but production continued for 90 years. A votive candle is Dutch is called a "Waxinelichtje" - officially in the dictionary since 1984.  In 1991 the factory was sold to candle maker Bolsius. These "waxine"lights were predominantly used in little stoves for keeping the tea warm. Every household had one.  Go to any market in Holland now and you can pick up glass tea stoves in all varieties. I believe a lot were made by Leerdam, but others were imported. I remember my grandmother had one in what I now know is the Jacobean pattern.
Ivo
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all texts and pictures (c) Ivo Haanstra.


Offline Glen

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Letters on my glass - 'tis a Mystery
« Reply #19 on: November 08, 2005, 02:46:19 PM »
Connie - thank you.

Anne - what interesting tea warmers. Coincidentally, an American- German friend of mine send me a pic of a very similar one today too. Thanks, for the info, Anne

Ivo - many thanks for the social history. I always find that aspect of glass collecting especially interesting. The Jacobean one sounds wonderful. Now, have you or anyone else ever seen a Carnival Glass one before? If there are any others "out there" I would love to know about the.

A friend in the USA who read my article last night contacted me to say that he has had the glass part of the item for several years (no metal top) and wondered what it could be. he thought perhaps it was meant to be the bottom of an electric lamp, with the holes in the bottom for the electric wires.

Thanks again for your help and comments, everyone.

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood

 

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