Author Topic: Mdina Pieces - Yes or No  (Read 1937 times)

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Offline chopin-liszt

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Mdina Pieces - Yes or No
« Reply #10 on: November 01, 2009, 11:18:02 AM »
Looking at the images in the thread about the bottle, I think it is, Adam.

But the actual colours are difficult to work out, because the pics are taken under artificial light, and against coloured backgrounds.

This piece is signed Pauline Solven, RCA '67, and shows an amethyst glass with silver salts features.

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b227/chopin-liszt/crizzle%20and%20ubdercliff/Paulinesyinyang1.jpg
Cheers, Sue (M)

Three Wise Women would have asked for directions, arrived on time, delivered the baby, cleaned the stables and made a casserole...

And there WOULD have been peace on earth.

Offline keith

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Mdina Pieces - Yes or No
« Reply #11 on: November 01, 2009, 01:23:58 PM »
You'll have to excuse my ignorance,who/what is RCA?

Offline chopin-liszt

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Mdina Pieces - Yes or No
« Reply #12 on: November 01, 2009, 02:04:46 PM »
Royal College of Art, Keith.
Where, back in '67, while Michael Harris was tutor in Industrial Glass, Sam Herman came over to give a lecture about the "new" form of glass, the recipe for which had been invented by Dominic Labino, which mean that small quantities of glass could be melted in a small kiln, rather than requiring the huge industrial sized pots used by big industry.

This meant that, for the first time, artists could get their paws on hot glass in a studio setting, and the Studio Glass Movement was born in America. 
Sam stayed on and hot glass facilities were set up at the RCA, bringing the Studio Glass Movement to the uk.
Michael Harris was incredibly inspired by all this, and went off to Malta to start Mdina glass, Sam took over at the RCA, and from his work with the students there, "The Glass House" was born - a small shop/studio, where the burgeoning new studio glass artists sold their work.

That's roughly it, in a nutshell.
Cheers, Sue (M)

Three Wise Women would have asked for directions, arrived on time, delivered the baby, cleaned the stables and made a casserole...

And there WOULD have been peace on earth.

Offline keith

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Mdina Pieces - Yes or No
« Reply #13 on: November 01, 2009, 02:51:17 PM »
Ta very much,have heard of Herman and Labino,saw a piece by Marinot a couple of months ago in Portobello,£2000 the dealer wanted,very large piece way out of my price range,beautiful though,Keith.

Offline Andy

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Mdina Pieces - Yes or No
« Reply #14 on: November 01, 2009, 03:14:05 PM »
Hi ,
yes foot on little bottle is clear, this is the thread,
http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,18422.0.html

(dont want to hijack this thread though! )
Andy
 ;)
"Born to lose, Live to win." Ian (Lemmy) Kilmister Motorhead (1945-????)

Offline chopin-liszt

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Mdina Pieces - Yes or No
« Reply #15 on: November 01, 2009, 03:17:34 PM »
 :24: :24: :24:

I would doubt very much indeed that the piece you saw was really by Maurice Marinot - especially at such a low price, Keith!
Tragically, most of Maurice Marinot's work was lost in a fire, very few pieces remain and most of them are in museums.

(I'm not laughing at you - but at the audacity of the seller!)

I think he is considered to be more part of the Arts and Crafts movement - he preceeds the Studio Glass Movement of the '60s.

Sam Herman (now a British citizen) is currently working with Adam,  - as in Adam Aaronson, who is right here on the GMB!
 
Cheers, Sue (M)

Three Wise Women would have asked for directions, arrived on time, delivered the baby, cleaned the stables and made a casserole...

And there WOULD have been peace on earth.

Offline keith

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Mdina Pieces - Yes or No
« Reply #16 on: November 01, 2009, 03:23:57 PM »
Like I said before I'm still learning,good job I didn't have the money to buy it then,intend to visit Adams studio on my next visit to town,Keith.

Offline chopin-liszt

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Mdina Pieces - Yes or No
« Reply #17 on: November 01, 2009, 03:27:42 PM »
The whole purpose of the GMB is to help folk learn, Keith.

Every question helps promote disscussion and to facilitate learning for everybody.
 :thup: :thup: :thup:

and as I edited to add, I wasn't laughing at you, but at the audacity of the seller - who had been hoping to take advantage of somebody, and hopefully, the GMB helps to prevent that sort of thing going on!
Cheers, Sue (M)

Three Wise Women would have asked for directions, arrived on time, delivered the baby, cleaned the stables and made a casserole...

And there WOULD have been peace on earth.

Offline Lustrousstone

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Mdina Pieces - Yes or No
« Reply #18 on: November 01, 2009, 05:06:37 PM »
Just my two pen'orth. It wasn't a recipe Labino came up with, it was a small enough gas-fired furnace that would melt cullet or marbles. John Airlie of Kirkhill Glass took it one stage further when he developed a small gas-fired furnace that would produce glass from scratch.

Offline chopin-liszt

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Mdina Pieces - Yes or No
« Reply #19 on: November 01, 2009, 06:04:54 PM »
 :thup:
Thanks, Christine.
I'll try to track down my reference for this, (can't remember where I read that bit in particular,perhaps I imagined it?). Have found this info, though, in "American Studio Glass 1969-1990". Martha Drexler Lynn.

p.54. "Littleton and Labino focussed on how to prepare molten glass that could be blown. The first batch of glass did not melt into a workable consistency, and the stoneware container (one of Littleton's vessels) used as the crucible broke apart in the high heat. Labino suggested that they remover the failed batch and melt directly into the tank. He also urged them not to waste time on perfecting glass formulas, but instead use his#475 glass marbles, which were used by Johns Manville to make fibreglass."
Cheers, Sue (M)

Three Wise Women would have asked for directions, arrived on time, delivered the baby, cleaned the stables and made a casserole...

And there WOULD have been peace on earth.

 



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