Author Topic: turquoise and gold vase  (Read 1563 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Jo in Australia

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 37
turquoise and gold vase
« on: November 08, 2005, 05:02:26 AM »
Hi all
I have an old turquoise and gold moulded vase. The gold appears to be a gold leaf type of thing rather than a painted surface.
Does anyone know how this is done? Is the glass reheated to attach the gold?
I have the same vase in clear and frosted glass without the metallic finish and it has a sharper look to the moulding. On the turquoise one even the ‘FRANCE’ on the base seems to have a slightly ‘melted’ look.
Thanks for any help.
Jo
 
 :D
o


Offline butchiedog

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 224
turquoise and gold vase
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2005, 02:12:55 PM »
Hi Jo,

It's hard to tell you much without seeing a picture of your vase. Different makers do a lot of look-a-like decorating etc., in their own different way, so knowing who made your item is why it's important that it be seen first.

You mentioned that it is marked "France" on its base, which sounds a lot like something by one of the "Arc International" of France glass makers, but maybe not.

Mike


Offline Frank

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 9387
  • Gender: Male
    • Glass history
    • Gateway
turquoise and gold vase
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2005, 03:00:41 PM »
Gold is usually applied as a suspension in enamel carrier or by transfer. Can be cold fixed, wears off easily, or fired on in an annealing or fusing kiln for a more durable result.
Frank A.
Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
Scotland's Glass - Ysart Glass
Glass Zoo - Glass Study.COM
Commercial Czech


Offline butchiedog

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 224
turquoise and gold vase
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2005, 03:45:00 PM »
There is also a process where a flux is applied to the area where they want to gold trim to be and then the gold is electro-plated on.

I know that Fenton trims many of their items using the enamel carrier, fired on method that Frank mentioned, but the process doesn't distort the pressed in pattern any, since the temperature needed to do it isn't hot enough to melt the glass.

Mike


Offline Jo in Australia

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 37
turquoise and gold vase
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2005, 10:10:17 PM »
Thanks for the replies.
The vase in question is an Andre Hunebelle design - but in a finish I've never seen before in his glass.
The gold is worn in places. The shininess of the gold makes it very hard to photograph (at least that's my excuse).
I have posted a picture here:
http://www.geocities.com/hunebelle/Hunebelle.html?1131487460864
o


Offline Frank

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 9387
  • Gender: Male
    • Glass history
    • Gateway
turquoise and gold vase
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2005, 11:21:36 PM »
You can probably get the gold restored quite easily. It will not be exactly the same colour but it is always best when doing such restorations to let the restoration be obvious - plus it would cost a lot to remove the existing gold and do the lot again. Of course, the new gold leaf will be cold applied and thus more easily worn off again but it will give a better appearance without causing harm.
Frank A.
Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
Scotland's Glass - Ysart Glass
Glass Zoo - Glass Study.COM
Commercial Czech


Offline Cathy B

  • Global Moderator
  • Members
  • *
  • Posts: 2767
  • Gender: Female
    • The Crown Crystal Glass Company of Australia
turquoise and gold vase
« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2005, 12:08:13 AM »
Quote from: "Frank"
Of course, the new gold leaf will be cold applied and thus more easily worn off again but it will give a better appearance without causing harm.


Would that sort of restoration effect value, Frank? Or is the value reduced by the original damage and won't be made any less by a reversable restoration for appearance?

PS thanks for fixing the log in! It was driving me nuts.


Offline Frank

  • Author
  • Members
  • ***
  • Posts: 9387
  • Gender: Male
    • Glass history
    • Gateway
turquoise and gold vase
« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2005, 07:42:59 AM »
Such a restoration is reversible and just improves the apperance.
Frank A.
Please help preserve glass web-sites for posterity by donating to The Glass Study Association a non-profit organisation.
Scotland's Glass - Ysart Glass
Glass Zoo - Glass Study.COM
Commercial Czech


 

Search
eBay.com
eBay.co.uk

Link to Glass Encyclopedia
Link to Glass Museum
Enter
key words
to search
Amazon.com