Author Topic: Visiting Murano  (Read 5685 times)

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Offline Bernard C

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Visiting Murano
« Reply #10 on: April 02, 2005, 08:39:12 AM »
Leni,

I don't know where I picked up my views on photography on Murano from.  Certainly the museum does have a ban on photography, and I did see a similar notice in one of the many churches.

Whatever, I still think it does no harm to ask before taking photographs on any private premises.

I will be taking my camera this autumn.   I hope that I will be as successful as you.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Anonymous

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« Reply #11 on: April 02, 2005, 09:29:41 AM »
Typical of pigeons, someone says boo! and they all fly away.


gareth


Offline Leni

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« Reply #12 on: April 02, 2005, 10:30:41 AM »
Quote from: "Anonymous"
Typical of pigeons, someone says boo! and they all fly away.

gareth

Quite right too, unless they are made of glass  :lol:  

Bernard, I don't know if I just failed to see a notice in the Glass Museum saying no photography  :oops:  or if (unlikely, I'd have thought) a ban was introduced in the year you first went, which was the year after we last went!  :shock:

However, I'd be very grateful if you would check when you're next there and let us know the situation, just in case we do get to go again!  (Working on husband  :wink: )  

Or if there is anyone else reading this who has been to Murano, are they able to provide info on this subject  :?

Leni
Leni


Offline Frank

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« Reply #13 on: April 02, 2005, 11:37:35 AM »
I am often puzzled why these bans are used, if they are scared of copying that could happen as soon as they sell one. If it is to prevent technique secrets leaking out then should not allow the public in in the first place, a visiting glassmaker would learn more by watching than from photographs.

It is understandable for museum's who supplement their income by selling pictures of their pieces.
Frank A.
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Offline Anne

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« Reply #14 on: April 02, 2005, 12:27:24 PM »
Just as a thought, Frank, as they're indoors maybe it's simply because the flash can cause problems for those working? We've all been momentarily dazzled by a camera flashing in our eyes at some time. If you're dealing with hot glass there's a safety issue in there - imagine being so dazzled whilst handling hot glass and the problems that could occur?


Offline Bernard C

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« Reply #15 on: April 03, 2005, 02:20:37 AM »
Re the ban on photography in museums, I think I have found another explanation.

We are off to Luxor for a couple of weeks in early summer, before it gets too hot.   Reading the guidebooks, we were initially surprised by the high cost of camera and video permits for the museums, temples, and tombs.

On reflection, however, the Egyptian system of permits has the advantage of making these sites more accessible to those on moderate budgets.   I have no doubt that the scale of camera and video permit charges is very carefully calculated to maximise tourist revenue.   And why not?   We will have to be very careful about spending.   Without such permits, entrance fees would have to be set higher, and could have made the whole holiday uneconomic for us.

I am sure that in the museum world the economics of camera and video permits is established and well known.   I would not be at all surprised if the museum on Murano has a similar system.

The permit system has the double advantage of maximising revenue while enabling those on modest budgets to enjoy their holidays and still have access to all the important venues.   I wish simple economics would always produce such an excellent result.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Bernard C

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Visiting Murano
« Reply #16 on: September 06, 2005, 08:18:49 AM »
Well, doesn't a year pass quickly!   We are off to Murano again in October, this time with camera.

One little task I have set for myself is to take photocopies of the early pages of Piña's Italian Glass — Century 20, so that I can write up some captions to the Murano outdoor photographs suitable for a survival guide.   Like "Two-storey Co-op supermarket just a few yards further on in the direction of the arrow, entrance through an archway - sells real pasteurised milk and English digestive biscuits."

I would be grateful for any suggestions as to glassworks to visit, and any that only open to visitors by pre-arranged appointment.

We would particularly love to visit a mould- and/or tool-making workshop; this would almost certainly have to be by appointment.   Could anyone suggest any visitor-friendly glassworks that would be worth approaching.

Any other ideas would be welcomed.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline chuggy

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murano visit
« Reply #17 on: September 06, 2005, 09:36:48 PM »
Bernard
I would recomend a visit to the Archimede Seguso works but a word of caution these have to be arranged in advance and will usually only be arranged if strong reference is made to Archimede Seguso and not just the Seguso name in general because of the other producers such as Seguso Vetri d'Arte, Livio Seguso etc.
Fabulous though and really a must visit.
Paul
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Offline Anne

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« Reply #18 on: September 06, 2005, 11:53:13 PM »
Bernard, I just found this and thought of you... perhaps it's useful?  8)
http://www.artsystem.it/en/musei_e.htm


Offline Leni

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« Reply #19 on: September 07, 2005, 05:23:06 PM »
Anne, that's a fantastic guide! :D  I've bookmarked it, as I *will* be going back to Murano one day soon!  I*will*! I *will*!  :x   :shock:  :oops: :roll:  

Thank you!  :D

Leni
Leni

 

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