Author Topic: Questions about antique Venetian aventurine glass bowls ID = Salviati C1877-1914  (Read 1954 times)

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Offline TxSilver

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Re: Questions about antique Venetian aventurine glass bowls
« Reply #10 on: March 26, 2010, 12:11:28 AM »
Yes, both are Salviati. The dates Sheldon Barr gives for these types of bowls is 1877-1914 (Venetian Glass: Confections in Glass).
Anita
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Offline northernridge

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Re: Questions about antique Venetian aventurine glass bowls
« Reply #11 on: March 26, 2010, 01:51:40 PM »
Thank you, Anita!


Offline northernridge

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New question. (As must be clear, I am a novice in this area.) I find a raised sort of bump where I suspect the artisan detached the glass when it was finished. It's on the bottom, exact center, of each piece. When I found the first one, on the green bowl, I took it for a chip because it's sharp. But as they all have a similar, (irregular) sharp feature, I suspect it is not a chip. Does this sound right?


Offline TxSilver

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They are pontil scars where the rod was used to support the glass during making. Venetian glass of this type generally do not have the scars polished out.
Anita
San Marcos Art Glass
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Offline northernridge

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I'm indeed grateful to you.

In the interest of accuracy and full disclosure, when running my finger all over the piece, inside and out, I've found some something inside the bowl that also has sharp edges, and feels like a chip. But it's inside one of the V shapes, and neither goes all the way through, nor has any sort of crack leading away from it. Could this also result from the process? (I would show it here, but imagine that would not comply with maximum of four photos rule.)

Also, the bowl wobbles slightly in the well. Would this be considered a flaw?


Offline northernridge

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It just occurred to me that this is in the shape of a bubble. So could it be one that burst? And if so, is it common, or a flaw?

(I'm getting such a rapid education here... I do hope this board will not tire of me!)


Offline northernridge

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Darn. I keep coming up with new questions. I do fear all will tire of me!

I think perhaps the second bowl would not be considered latticino decoration. Is that correct?


Offline Lustrousstone

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Old glass is not always perfectly shaped or formed. The wobble is fine. The burst bubble is OK too; it's probably been burst for 100 years. It's hand made glass and although there would have been some QC, what was acceptable and what was not was very different from today's demands for perfection. If you intend selling these, you should point such things out but they are minor issues.

And no I don't think the second bowl is latticino


Offline TxSilver

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In the interest of accuracy and full disclosure, when running my finger all over the piece, inside and out, I've found some something inside the bowl that also has sharp edges, and feels like a chip. But it's inside one of the V shapes, and neither goes all the way through, nor has any sort of crack leading away from it. Could this also result from the process? (I would show it here, but imagine that would not comply with maximum of four photos rule.)

Also, the bowl wobbles slightly in the well. Would this be considered a flaw?

You don't need fully disclosure here, though I know customers will appreciate it if you sell the bowls. No worries.

Often glass that is made with individual canes of glass have imperfections where the glass meets. I had one customer that returned a gorgeous bowl to me because it had all this "cracks that were forming inside." I couldn't figure out what he was talking about until I got the bowl back. It was where the canes were meeting! He was new to art glass.

About the wobble -- yes, it matters if the wobble is severe. It means the bowl was not finished properly.

Your second bowl is simply called aventurine ribbons or canes. It is a very desirable bowl.. unless it is the one with the wobble. Then it is only desirable.
Anita
San Marcos Art Glass
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Offline northernridge

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The first, green, one has the bigger wobble. (I have one just like it in pink, so I won't bother to show it before listing. No wobble.)

The one that is more desirable actually has a slight wobble, both the saucer and the bowl. Sigh. When agitated, the cup actually rocks slightly for a few moments, which the green one won't do. You can simply rock the bowl back and forth.

 



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