Author Topic: id request for amber drinking glass  (Read 524 times)

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Offline Paul S.

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id request for amber drinking glass
« on: March 30, 2010, 07:33:51 PM »
bearing in mind the colour, plus the waisted shape and the rather large ground and polished pontil mark  -  I wondered if it might possibly have been wfrs.    However, having looked through the catalogues, I now don't think it is.      You can see the slight Wrythen style as well  -  but the rather large ground pontil mark seemed unusual if it had been a low cost item.     About 145mm tall.     Interested if anyone has any ideas or comments, and thanks for looking.


Offline robbo

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Re: id request for amber drinking glass
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2010, 04:01:14 PM »
Hi - it looks like one of these, on the right in the main photo. Must have come in three sizes judging by the line drawings but I can't make out a pattern number or the sizes.

http://www.whitefriarsorg.org/memb1/cat-60/p07.jpg

robbo
robbo


Offline Paul S.

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Re: id request for amber drinking glass
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2010, 06:57:26 PM »
thanks robbo  -  I am a little wiser now and do try some research before I post, so was aware of course that there is this 'waisted' M104 tumbler from at least a couple of catalogues.   However, I don't know if M104 is quite this 'waisted' or even that it had a 'wrythen' style like mine.    From experience I know that there is a world of difference between 'looking like this', and actually being the real thing.    Sincere thanks for your interest, and we now need an expert to help, I think.  My problem is that whenever I see 'amber/gold' with a ground pontil I automatically think of wfrs. :)


Offline robbo

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Re: id request for amber drinking glass
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2010, 07:17:25 PM »
Hi Paul—no one else has contributed here—so I thought I'd have another stab  :P
Your piece is definitely not an M104 tumbler—like you say yourself M104 has no optic ribbing and has a less pronounced waist.
The catalogue link I posted above was for a vase from the 1960 catalogue, available in three sizes. Like I said, I can't make out the pattern no. or sizes from the scan, but the photograph shows a vase of the same shape as your piece, with a pronounced waist and vertical optic ribbing.
Also check pattern #9464 from the 1957 catalogue (but appears only available in 13" in the '57 catalogue).

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From experience I know that there is a world of difference between 'looking like this', and actually being the real thing.
I agree; but if I felt I didn't have something to contribute then I wouldn't have bothered.

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My problem is that whenever I see 'amber/gold' with a ground pontil I automatically think of wfrs. :)
or Stuart, or Webb or a good few others! The important thing, IMHO, is the way the pontil mark has been ground out & polished in combination with a whole host of other factors.
robbo


Offline Paul S.

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Re: id request for amber drinking glass
« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2010, 01:04:36 PM »
robbo  -  thanks for the contribution again.    Apologies if you thought I was 'knocking' your comments, certainly not my intention  -  it's just that I try to be a little more cautious now and think before I engage mouth ;D, and I sense you may well know a lot more about wfrs. than me.    In fact I had hoped that one of the other wfrs. buffs may have added something to help.    I will continue looking, and you are correct of course that amber/gold etc. cud well be any one of several sources, and I may have to put this particular piece on the back burner when I have more time and perhaps have some more inspiration.    thanks again.     Paul S.

 

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