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Author Topic: Ruby Cut To Clear  (Read 1455 times)

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Offline Paul ADK

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Ruby Cut To Clear
« on: November 23, 2005, 03:06:08 AM »
I recently picked up two pieces of Ruby Glass cut to clear from an estate sale, that look good but probably are Polish or some such.  The quality of the cutting is as good or better than most newer glass I have seen, and there appears to be an appropriate amount of wear on both items.  On the other hand, the fact that there were two matching pieces sends my suspicious nature into overdrive.  Any suggestions as to probable age and origin will be appreciated.  
(My wife is betting six weeks and the Dollar Store.)  
http://community.webshots.com/user/pauladk100

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Offline paradisetrader

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Ruby Cut To Clear
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2005, 02:29:40 AM »
Hi Paul
I don't know a lot about this kind of glass but just some observations.
Photo #2 was rather disturbing until I realised it was out of focus and looked at photo#1.

Firstly, altho it's hard to be sure, these don't strike me as new / newer production. The Catherine Wheel and Star-of-David motifs are quite traditional and often seen. The newer work I have seen tends to use less traditional designs and lighter brighter colors.

The window cuts on the neck of the pitcher are a very Bohemian trait but of course this could be copied by others, although not easy to do on such a very curved surface I wouldn't have thought.

Others here may be able to comment on the unusual looking dog bone lower join of the pitcher handle....unless I am just seeing something which is a trick of the light ?

The Poles do have quite a long tradition of cutting I believe and their work is good quality. I was recently told that the Chinese are also doing cut-to-clear these days but I somehow doubt these are.

I will try to contact someone who can give a more informed opinion.
Pete

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Offline Paul ADK

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Ruby Cut To Clear
« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2005, 03:05:11 AM »
Thanks Peter!  I have posted a few more photos that may help.  I am not familiar with the term "dog bone" so I took one shot of the handle that came out decent.  I had a lot less luck with the pitcher base, eight shots and the choice was out of focus or blinding glare.  The one I put up is the best of the lot.

Paul ADK

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Offline paradisetrader

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Ruby Cut To Clear
« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2005, 12:48:07 PM »
Dog Bone
It's not a term Paul, just something I made up to describe what I thought I was seeing from the photo - but I was wrong.
However the join does look very neat but I know very little about handles and joins.
Pete

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Offline Micro-Wave

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Ruby Cut to Clear
« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2005, 05:34:47 PM »
After looking at all of the pictures of the bowl and pitcher, I would venture an opinion that the glass is of fairly recent vintage (past 30 years or so.) The glass looks, to me, to be of Bohemian origin due to the decor.
Peter, as to the color, yes a lot of the recent glass coloration is less intense, but current production of Egermann as well as glass houses near the Passau area are producing that darker ruby glass. As an example, here is a picture of a piece I bought in Arnbruck, Germany last year with the same coloration of the overlay:
http://www.PixClix.com/Micro-Wave/Germany-2004/July08-Frauenau/38-Vase.jpg
Also from the same area is a picture of current production cuttings with similar decor (please excuse fuzziness of the snapshot.)
http://www.PixClix.com/Micro-Wave/Germany-2004/July08-Frauenau/11-Frauenau-Glass.jpg
I hope this gives you some direction in which to look.

Orville

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Sklounion

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Ruby Cut To Clear
« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2005, 06:53:18 AM »
As Peter and Orville suggest these are probably Czech/Bohemian in origin. Indeed Egermann have always been a big manufacturer of glass of this type.

As Peter right mentions, there is increasing amounts of this type of cut to clear glass coming out of China, decorated with many traditional western cutting patterns. Recently there have been a number of auctions on eBay featuring this Chinese glass by a US based seller. People may think it is worth having a look, at what is now available.

IMHO, the problem with cut to clear, is that many companies have tended not to develop new patterns. There is good demand for the older stuff, and some manufacturers have been lazy, by relying on old pattern books, which makes them vulnerable to copying, and causes difficulty identifying makers.

Regards,

Marcus

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Offline Frank

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Ruby Cut To Clear
« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2005, 06:57:36 AM »
Relying on the old patterns is fine, particularly in table-ware as it means folk can keep their sets complete for life. Certain firms have particular designs which work well and are timeless (except when they are out of fashion of course :P )

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Offline Micro-Wave

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Ruby Cut To Clear
« Reply #7 on: November 25, 2005, 03:13:36 PM »
I totally agree with Frank in that I originally purchased several pieces of cut glass in Zurich back in the 70's that I really enjoyed. They didn't know the origin at that time other than it has come "from the East.." Well, the east was apparently from the German/Czech border as I found identical pattern cuttings in a shop in Frauenau which were cut by an old master craftsman in his shop. Here is a link to some of his wares:
http://www.PixClix.com/Micro-wave/Germany-2004/July08-Frauenau/16-Frauenau-Glass.jpg and
http://www.PixClix.com/Micro-wave/Germany-2004/July08-Frauenau/18-Frauenau-Glass.jpg
It is refreshing to find that the same pattern with the intricate detail cutting was available after 35 years...

P.S. Sorry for the broken links on the original post which have now been repaired.

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Offline Paul ADK

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Ruby Cut To Clear
« Reply #8 on: November 25, 2005, 03:43:57 PM »
I want to thank everyone for taking the time to make suggestions.  I just Googled Egermann, and am quite confident that is where the two pieces we have came from.   Fortunately for the wallet, we bought for looks and not because we had dreams of Sotheby's dancing in our heads.

P.S.  Every so often someone mentions Woolworth's.  Is that the same F.W.Woolworth (now defunct here in the states) that used to run five and dime stores, and are they still in business overseas?

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Sklounion

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Ruby Cut To Clear
« Reply #9 on: November 25, 2005, 04:36:06 PM »
Hi Paul,

re F.W. Woolworth, (Barbara Hutton, had the misfortune to be known as the Woolworth heiress),yes the store was known as the sixpenny shop in the UK. Now part of the Kingfisher trading group.

Orville and Frank, I was not implying that there is something wrong with traditional cutting or that there is something wrong with being able to get the same pattern pieces as replacements.
Regards,

Marcus

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