Author Topic: Questions about Nazeing / other similar British glass  (Read 951 times)

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Offline paulbowen

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Questions about Nazeing / other similar British glass
« on: April 30, 2010, 02:48:53 PM »
Hi Everyone, the discussion of the "Scottish, maybe WMF" (http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,33152.0/topicseen.html) bowl was really helpful to me with identifying several mystery pieces that I've seen over the years, thanks very much.  I have a question: does anyone know if Nazeing, or a similar British manufacturer of "cluthra" type glass, ever used sulphur in their bubbles?  I have seen several examples of a type of glass that is very similar to this Nazeing stuff, but with sulphur (yellow) bubbles.  Any ideas?  All feedback would be appreciated; it's like my own personal "cellophane glass" mystery.  Also, where can I learn more about Nazeing and similar glass?  I quick browse of the web revealed a few photos, but the results were rather general.  Thanks again.  :)


Offline nigel benson

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Re: Questions about Nazeing / other similar British glass
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2010, 07:22:22 PM »
Hello Paul,

The only book that has any depth about Nazeing glass is the one by Geoff Timberlake, called "75 Years of Diverse Glass-making to the World"; A celebration of Nazeing Glass Works 1928-2003 and an exploration of their Victorian origins. This was self-published by Geoff in 2003 and coincided with tour exhibition "Nazeing Glass andd its Origins" held at Lowewood Museum, Hoddesdon. I have a small amount of information on my website about it and Nazeing glass - which I've just checked and I'm afraid has some glitches :huh: :huh:  -  I will try to get that sorted out ASAP :thup:

I have to say I do not recognise the description of yellow bubbles in Nazeing items.

For technical information about Nazeing glass, I think you either have to hope that Stephen Pollock-Hill catches this discussion, or you should email him at Nazeing Glass.

I hope that helps a bit, Nigel


Offline paulbowen

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Re: Questions about Nazeing / other similar British glass
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2010, 07:43:22 PM »
Thank you very much, I really appreciate it.  I'll have to engage my wife in getting some pics of my odd sulphur "cluthra" vases up on the board here, she's the family tech guru.  Until then, though, I'm really struck by their similarity to these Scottish items.  Thank you again.


Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: Questions about Nazeing / other similar British glass
« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2010, 11:49:19 AM »
 :)
I was of the impression that "Cluthra" referred specifically to designs by Christopher Dresser, Cluthra being an ancient name for the Clyde (the river Glasgow stands on),
and, while the few beautiful pieces I've seen do have tinly flecks of colour, that the bubbles were just clear bubbles.
Cheers, Sue (M)

“All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.” Friedrich Nietzsche


Offline nigel benson

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Re: Questions about Nazeing / other similar British glass
« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2010, 04:58:06 PM »
Hi Sue,

I think your thinking about Clutha (without the 'r'), which was made by James Couper and Sons, Scotland with designs by C Dresser and Walton.

Cluthra is a similar type of look to Nazeing et al, but made by Steuben.

Nigel  ;)


Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: Questions about Nazeing / other similar British glass
« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2010, 11:58:02 AM »
 :kissy:

Thank-you yet again, Nigel. Steuben's American and well out of my price bracket, so I've tried (unsuccessfully, bits seep in) to ignore it.
But I've learned two very significant bits of info. here - S&W did stuff with "those" bubbles surrounded by deeper solidish enamels, and Steuben did Clutha-style stuff.

Trouble is, it just adds to my knowledge of my lack of knowledge!

But that IS a good thing. :clap:
Cheers, Sue (M)

“All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.” Friedrich Nietzsche


Offline paulbowen

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Re: Questions about Nazeing / other similar British glass
« Reply #6 on: May 02, 2010, 03:30:13 PM »
These definitions of cluthra / clutha are all correct.  However, the term is also used generically for bubbly glass which has the type of bubbles associated with these makers' products.  That is why I used the term in quotes in my original post, and undoubtedly why Carder used the term for his product line as well.


Offline nigel benson

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Re: Questions about Nazeing / other similar British glass
« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2010, 12:10:14 PM »
Hi,

Just checking in.

I understood your use of the term 'Cluthra' in the original post Paul, but I have never known it used as a generic term for this type of glass in the UK - only as the name of a range designed by Frederick Carder and made by Steuben before the Second World War.

Certainly I don't use it because of it's association with American wares, although I can see that you were probably using it as a sort of shorthand to explain what information you were seeking.

I notice that I have only homed in on Nazeing. Equally well I cannot think of another British firm that might have produced what you describe. Is there any chance of a photo? It could help immensely.

Nigel


Offline nigel benson

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Re: Questions about Nazeing / other similar British glass
« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2010, 12:53:14 PM »
Hmm,

I've just re-read your first posting Paul and something suddenly occured to me - apart from the fact that you won't be able to post a picture 'cos you say that they are pieces that you've seen, and therefore don't have in you hands - I wonder if your describing some of the work that has been attributed to Nazeing through the Elwell 'find' a couple of years back?

Some of the pieces have the look of having yellowness around the bubbles, but that is achieved through the combination of the casing over the white enamel within. Usually this is most evident with green(s) - see below.

Do the pieces that you have seen have snapped off pontils as well?

Nigel


Offline paulbowen

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Re: Questions about Nazeing / other similar British glass
« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2010, 04:00:19 PM »
Hi Nigel, thanks again for the info.  I'm in the US, and here the word cluthra (and occasionally clutha) gets tossed around pretty liberally as a generic term for any glass that has lots of bubbles in it not in a controlled pattern, especially if its internally decorated through the use of colored powders (frit).  As a result, here "cluthra" is used to describe everything from WMF Ikora to Ysart, including Setuben and even obscure Czech and Murano, although most people do understand that the terms (Clutrha and Clutha) do really refer to the British product lines with which they originated.  Basically, if you've got an internally decorated, colorful piece with random bubbles, you can call it cluthra and people will get the basic idea of what you're talking about, without being precise.  Similarly, the terms Czech, Murano, and Loetz can be manipulated to have wide ranging meanings over here which are highly inaccurate but descriptive.

With your help, I was able to identify the mystery vases I was referring to as Nazeing.  Two have no pontil, while one does.

Is the piece you show in your last post (above) a Nazeing piece?  If not, who did make it?  What is the "Elwell find?" 

Thank you again.

 

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