Author Topic: Lampwork figure  (Read 965 times)

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Offline soledivo

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Lampwork figure
« on: May 09, 2010, 09:57:18 PM »
Hi everyone, hope you're all well.

this figure stands at a shade under 23cm or 9".
It has the generic "VETRO DI MURANO" paper label.

I've never thought much of it myself,
but as a bone of contention when ever I have guests instead of commenting on one of the quality pieces I have they always see this "oh thats nice ect."

Obviously modern by the subject, I wonder if there may have been a series depicting the modern dance gymnastic variations.
I have serched through numerous companies looking for similar with no luck.
I'm sure you know it, but this site gives a list of the companies using this label, or some of them at least.

http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=web&ct=res&cd=2&ved=0CCsQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.muranoglass.com%2F&ei=li3nS6-QEs2osAblvrWeBg&usg=AFQjCNEkqrOzDVT7MxNKnUMtNhsrluyzqw

So I thought I'd ask you for your opinions, am I getting a bit snobbish in my opinion as I'm learning more ?
Any chance anyone has an idea of the maker ?

thanks as always 
martin


Offline soledivo

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Re: Lampwork figure
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2010, 03:06:08 AM »
i just realised I've chopped the top of the pics off,

sorry about that, I've got a bit rusty.  :hb1:
martin


Offline antiquerose123

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Re: Lampwork figure
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2010, 04:07:53 AM »
 :hiclp: She looks drop dead gorgeous.  Very, very nice.  Can you take a pic when it is lite up as a lamp??  would love to see that.

 :thup:
:fwr: Rose
"People who live in Glass houses should not throw stones"       ::)


Offline soledivo

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Re: Lampwork figure
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2010, 10:42:55 AM »
hi Rose,

she isn't a lamp, "lampwork" worked from rods , as in "not blown glass" 
martin


jazimmons

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Re: Lampwork figure
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2010, 08:47:08 PM »
Your Highness . . .   As a glass blower/lamp worker myself (AND ALSO NEW TO THESE PAGES - please break me in gently!) I must say that this is not an accomplished item, but still beautiful just the same.  I can say this, for "us glass-workers" always tend to attribute makers skill to that of the foot or the base of an item, of which is the arguably the most difficult in terms of technical abillity and skill to make in glass.   It can take FIVE YEARS or more to spin oput a round foot for a drinking glass (for example) of more than 2" diam!  And a spun foot still remains the most desirable of stands for such glass.  One sees many of such items with bases of wood and or onyx and the likes, due to the fact that most lamp workers have a very limited "flame-size" at their disposal. Particularly when using soda-lime glass (as your item has been produced from).  Gas & air, melts soda lime glass and a simple Bunsen Burner can achieve remarkable results, however the flame size is limited, hence the reduced sizes of the bases/stands and feet of these pieces. 9 out of ten, will crack after cooling! They are also quite literally "annealed" whilst being made at the lamp, where as Borosillicate glass can stand higher degrees of melting temperature and is less volatile during annealing. At best needing NONE! 

Borosillicate glass on the other hand will take much more working time allowance. Gas and oxygen is needed to melt this glass and the lamp burners are equipped with rotating flame sized jets.  From say a needle sized flame to one as large as ten inches wide or more!  This enables one to spin out a foot and to afford a larger, stronger base to such items as like your item as shown.  This glass also requires no annealing time and TIME equals money! The down side of such glass is that colours are very limited and insiped - even today.  I have spent some TWENTY YEARS OR MORE developing colourant recipes which are compatable to Borosillicate and trust me, its been difficult. 

Anyway, whoever it was that produced your Lady, is technically accomplished and what I say above should not detract, however, as with any so-called artist (no matter how accomplished) one is only as good as ones "ideas".  I wouldn't mind BETTING that your gymnast is from one of a series that "The Lamp Worker" is proud of, will continue to be, and will develop ever further.  Your lady IS modern, but thank the lords that new glass makers are ensuring that "GLASS ARTISTRY" is not a dieing trade! Jazz. 


Offline soledivo

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Re: Lampwork figure
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2010, 10:48:06 PM »
Fascinating reply jazimmons, thankyou  :hiclp:

I've learnt more from your info. than I have in the last 4 years re. lampwork.

I hope you become a reguar user of this wonderful forum. 
 :chky: :chky:
martin


Offline Jurgen

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Re: Lampwork figure
« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2010, 03:42:30 PM »
Thanks for all the great info Jazz!! I've already printed out this page. Super!!.................Jerry
BTW.........I think this is one of the foot cracks you are talking about (2" diameter).


jazimmons

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Re: Lampwork figure
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2010, 04:10:51 PM »
Hi Jurgen.  It's always nice to know that my imput is helpful.  I do have quite a few items of murano and venitian glass. Some of which you yourself might be able to identify, as murano is truly not my own field of personal collecting. Will list them in due course.  Some of which are true c18th & c19th items. Vetro a fili, vetro a retorti & vetro a reticello and the likes, together with some c20th century items of fish etc.

The FOOT crack that you show, often happens after annealing. It is difficult for me to explain this fully to you, however will do my best for you here.

Basically, the foot of an item is more than just usually the last thing to make upon ANY glass. A "TUBE" of glass is attached to the base part and this attachment is crucial if the foot is to be perfect. It has got to be attached centrally. This tube is then heated and spun constantly until such a time when a reamer can be inserted into the molten glass tube . . .   One then gets one chance only to spin out the foot and to adjust it so that it stands upright and circluar.  There is no going back!  Much work may have been done to the upper parts of the glass, but all shall be wasted unless the foot is got right!

The CRACKING OF A FOOT, usually happens if and when any more top work to an item needs to be made.  The hot pontil will need to be placed inside the base of the foot, so as to make these adjustments,  and the heat therefore applied will cause stress to the foot  which will not be identified until the whole item has been annealed! Get me? 

I do hope I am making sense!  Only once the entire item has cooled, will the foot crack.  Many firms of today of course use glass lathes to spin out the foot, which is by far easier but costly, but lathe maked is not hand made, get my drift! Jazz. 


Offline Jurgen

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Re: Lampwork figure
« Reply #8 on: May 12, 2010, 05:37:54 PM »
Hi Jazz......I want to personally thank you for explaining this procedure in such a manner that even a lay person like myself can under stand it! Looking forward to seeing some of your glass! Again, many thanks..................Jerry


jazimmons

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Re: Lampwork figure
« Reply #9 on: May 13, 2010, 08:03:38 PM »
SOLEDIVO & JURGEN . . .  Check out eBay item number 140405475330, where you will see same examples of your lampworked gymnast by the same maker as your own.  Listed as being Murano.  There are several of them being offered by the same seller.  Make your comparisions and enjoy!  Jazz :P

 

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