Author Topic: An unusual 'dime a dozen' weight  (Read 1951 times)

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Offline ALLAN

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An unusual 'dime a dozen' weight
« Reply #10 on: November 29, 2005, 08:44:45 PM »
Hi Leni,
          I have just been looking at your weight and I have an idea on how the top lyer of petals were made.Hard to be certain off a picture but to me it looks like the weight was made with the blowing iron originally connected where the top is ,while the crimp bottom half was constructed and an overlaid base attached.The weight would then be "puntied" as we call it so that a second "iron" would be joined to the base and the original one "knocked off" so the maker could then pick up the first two layers of petals,prbably with a small "drop-on" of glass between them.The final folded over layer could have been done in one of two ways.A) A helper could have attached a previously made button of petals from a third iron;by pressing it into the weight from the front while the maker snipped it off and then smoothed it into shape.B) The button could have been "picked up" from a hot plate,ready shaped.The button itself is simple to construct;all you need to do is shape a small cylinder of hot glass and pick up a ring of petals round the outside,the maker would then "cut in" the glass at two points close to each other to form the shape of the button between the "cut ins".This could then be stuck on the top of the weight as it is and flattened on the final shapinp or as I said the whole button could be shaped on the iron then cut off and picked up like a piece of lampwork.Of course I could be totally wrong but thats the way I would probably make it(mind you I would make the button on the lampwork burner,much easier :lol: )
                                      Allan


Offline Leni

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An unusual 'dime a dozen' weight
« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2005, 09:48:14 PM »
:shock:  :shock:  :shock: Wow!  Thanks so much, Allan!  That's exactly what I wanted to know!   :D  

You make it sound quite simple in some ways, and yet in others, very complicated!   :roll:   Having seen Alastair making paperweights at Broadfield House earlier this year, I can actually visualise many of the steps you describe.  I know you expert workers in glass have the ability to make it look effortless, but you all have my deepests admiration!   :shock:

Many thanks for taking the time (again!   :oops: ) to describe the techniques.
Leni


 

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