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Author Topic: Opal spaghetti bowl  (Read 2799 times)

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Offline albglass

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Czech opalescent glass--anyone know anything about the MJ Company?
« Reply #20 on: May 02, 2011, 04:52:11 AM »
This opalescent candlestick has a black and white sticker on the bottom.  It is a glass mark shown in Barta and Rose's book, Czechoslovakian Glass and Collectibles Book II on page 157, except that the authors copied the company name incorrectly.  Their mark showed Mco in the corners, while the label has a definite J under the M so the correct company name would be MJ company.  Does anyone know anything about this company--for instance, whether they were based in Czechoslovakia exporting glass, or based elsewhere importing Czech glass?  Thanks for your help! 


Offline Ivo

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Re: Czech opalescent glass--anyone know anything about the MJ Company?
« Reply #21 on: May 02, 2011, 06:20:36 AM »
I read it as JM Co. and the "Co." part is not Czech - so I would suspect it to be an importer's label rather than a maker's one.
Ivo
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Offline albglass

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Re: Czech opalescent glass--anyone know anything about the MJ Company?
« Reply #22 on: May 02, 2011, 04:27:11 PM »
Ah, yes, I can see where it is more likely to read JM.  No wonder I wasn't getting anywhere finding any information on the company.  Also knowing that Co would not have been used by a Czech firm is important information.  Thanks, Ivo!


Offline Anne

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Re: Czech opalescent glass--anyone know anything about the MJ Company?
« Reply #23 on: May 02, 2011, 09:17:14 PM »
albglass I've merged your topic into an earlier one which has info of relevance to yours - including more examples of this type of glass and the label.


Offline flying free

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Re: Opal spaghetti bowl
« Reply #24 on: May 02, 2011, 09:34:34 PM »
Ivo, I meant to say your vases are beautiful!!
m


Offline albglass

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Re: Opal spaghetti bowl
« Reply #25 on: May 03, 2011, 05:22:25 AM »
Gee, I had no idea when I bought the candlestick that the country of origin for Target Swirl was not well known.  The seventh edition of the Standard Encyclopedia of Opalescent Glass said it was speculated that the pattern was Bohemian so I figured someone had some information about it, although they hadn't listed a candlestick as a known shape (known to the author, that is).  I guess the label on the candlestick proves that this pattern came out of Czechoslovakia, cool!  I still am curious about the importer, though.  I'd love to know from which companies the importer was buying Czech glass.  Craig, you mentioned that some of your friends have glass with this same label.  Do you happen to know if any of them can be tied to any Czech makers?  Are any of them the Harlequin opalescent pattern (diamonds within diamonds)?  I am afraid that this is much too much to hope for, but you never know.  Thanks!


Offline obscurities

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Re: Opal spaghetti bowl
« Reply #26 on: May 03, 2011, 01:06:33 PM »
No, We do not know the importer of the glass, only that it was manufactured in Czechoslovakia......  I was the under bidder by the way....   :thud:

Craig
I have been told that glass is my mistress......


Offline albglass

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Re: Opal spaghetti bowl
« Reply #27 on: May 03, 2011, 05:02:57 PM »
So sorry Craig.  I wanted another example of Bohemian opalescent glass for a book that I have been working on for the past 10 years on glass decorative techniques (I already have a blue uranium glass rosebowl in the Harlequin pattern).  I will be doing the photography this year and hope to publish next year (or at least get it to the publisher next year).  Although the book includes a lot of glass from other collections, I have around 1300 pieces of my own that I acquired specifically for the book.  That's really too much to display as they deserve to be displayed, so I will be selling many of them once the book is out, probably on Ebay if Ebay is still around then.  So you may have another chance at getting the candlestick sometime down the road!  I just want to say that you folks on the glass message board are a wealth of information and I can't thank you all enough for helping me with some difficult attributions as well as providing the general glass collecting community an incredible service.  You folks are the best!   :rah:


Offline Glas Vasen

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Re: Opal spaghetti bowl
« Reply #28 on: May 08, 2011, 04:09:57 PM »
Guzzini Glass from Italy has too dose Swirl thingy and Band Glass(in any Colours), as well he selling spaghetti and Deserts Bowl.

Ivo did u use it yet?

Question if the rim is polished means this a New Piece, or is this usual for older bowls.


Sergio
   
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Offline Ivo

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Re: Opal spaghetti bowl
« Reply #29 on: May 08, 2011, 05:49:52 PM »
In Czech glass you often find polished rims, as this is an efficient way of finishing a piece. The process if somethings called "blown from the top" - but not everyone likes that term. It means that a piece is blown in a mould and cracked off - the final operation is then polishing the top smooth.  The alternative is to hot finish the rim with tongs. It is more elegant, but requires an additional operation, namely a pontil rod, as well as cracking off the pontil rod and finishing the mark.

Both methods have been used by all glass makers everywhere. You do not spend more work on a piece than necessary. And it is not an indication of age, only quality. Incidentally, if a piece has a polished rim AND a pontil mark, it may be reworked, as it makes no technical sense.
Ivo
► BLUE HENRY ◄
 New Book: The Almost Forgotten Story of the Blue Glass Sputum Flask

all texts and pictures (c) Ivo Haanstra.

 



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