Author Topic: Rather crude lampworked flower weight  (Read 1321 times)

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Offline Leni

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Rather crude lampworked flower weight
« on: December 07, 2005, 10:14:14 AM »
Here's another new one for my 'dime a dozen' collection :wink: , but I don't think this is Chinese - not if the base is anything to go by  :shock:   http://tinypic.com/ibgxs9.jpg  http://tinypic.com/ibgxsz.jpg  http://tinypic.com/ibgxtx.jpg

As you can see, the flower is quite crude, and the stem is attached under one petal instead of in the centre.  There are a couple of bubbles where there shouldn't be, and one of the petals - which appear to be white glass cased in clear pink, and have a sort of 'quilted' effect, almost like satin air-trap - looks smaller than the others, because it has slipped slightly underneath the yellow 'blob'.  

However, the base is concave and polished absolutely clear!  :shock:   :?

Any ideas?
Leni


Offline KevinH

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Rather crude lampworked flower weight
« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2005, 06:42:27 PM »
Hmmm .... interesting ......

I wonder where that was made ....

How much concavity (is that a real word?) is there to the base? And is there a definite outer rim to the base - if so - how wide is it, and is there any age wear?
KevinH


Offline Leni

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Rather crude lampworked flower weight
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2005, 07:14:22 PM »
I'm sure 'concavity' is a word!  :shock:  If it wasn't, we would need to invent it, to describe the basal .... er.... concavity! of paperweights!  :lol:  :roll:

This one's base is quite noticeably concave, and it has no outer rim but finishes with a very clear line, so only very slight signs of wear can be seen under magnification at the extreme edge.  The glass is very clear and free from any scuffs or scrapes, too.  

Intriguing, eh?   :?
Leni


Offline RAY

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Rather crude lampworked flower weight
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2005, 11:20:51 PM »
this one was in my watch list, but never bid on it, cause you beat me to it, well the lampwork is on the poor side but the leaves petals and the mottled ground point towards a strathearn reject
cheers Ray


Offline Leni

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Rather crude lampworked flower weight
« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2005, 09:17:18 AM »
Quote from: "RAY"
the leaves petals and the mottled ground point towards a strathearn reject

 :D I'd say that's a very good possible, Ray!

What I find really interesting is the 'quilted' effect on the petals, almost like satin air-trap, which can only be seen when the light hits it at a certain angle  :shock:  http://tinypic.com/ic8f1w.jpg

It looks to me as if the petals might have been flattened at some stage (possibly before the clear pinkglass overlay) with a tool with a cross-hatched surface.  Does anyone have a Strathhearn flower weight they could look at under magnification, to see if the petals have the same effect?  That might help to establish the ID :D
Leni


Offline RAY

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Rather crude lampworked flower weight
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2005, 06:15:11 PM »
mine have no quilted effect but straight lines, but on your Leni weight  they might of used the same tool twice at a diffrent angle


cheers Ray


Offline KevinH

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Rather crude lampworked flower weight
« Reply #6 on: December 09, 2005, 12:26:48 PM »
I always thought:

For "petals with straight lines", take a length of cog cane and flatten out with tweezers. Most lampworked petals and stems are made from white-core rods (round or cogs) with a colour flashing. Depending on how the length is worked, the ridges of cogs will show through as stripes and very often the white core will show through at the tip and edges where the petal or leaf has been gripped and pulled in the making.

"Quilted" patterns in lampwork may well be the result of using a form of crimping tool to flatten the rod. I believe the petals of Frank Eisner lampwork were formed (at least partly) with a crimping tool as they usually show 9 air bubbles in a regular pattern to the underside.
KevinH


 



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