Author Topic: Black and Copper? Swirl Paperweight ID  (Read 1482 times)

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Offline KevinH

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Re: Black and Copper? Swirl Paperweight ID
« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2010, 12:29:19 AM »
Paul Dunlop's book? Hmmm. Isn't that the book that has an entry which starts, "Venice a city in France ..." :huh:

Sorry, I couldn't resist it.

But more seriously, the use of the term "Latticino" (or "Latticinio") is perhaps a complex subject for study within glass literature and glassworking around the world.

If "Latticino" only applies to white threads, should coloured threads, used in the same way, only be called "Filigrana"? Newman's "Illustrated Dictionary of Glass" goes to some lengths to define and comment on such usage, but so far I have not felt that I have properly understood what he said, even after several readings!!
KevinH


Offline Sach

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Re: Black and Copper? Swirl Paperweight ID
« Reply #11 on: August 11, 2010, 02:39:02 AM »
My understanding of proper usage did not come from Dunlop's book.  That was simply the first source I found that addressed the question directly.  I based my statement upon my training and experience as an amateur glassblower.  I think there may be room to question if colored filligrano could not be properly called latticino (even though I do not believe it could).  I do not believe that there is any reason to believe that the Italian "latticino" is based upon the English word "lattice"  Granted Italian and English both have their roots in Latin and Greek but they are very different in the directions they went from there.


Offline langhaugh

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Re: Black and Copper? Swirl Paperweight ID
« Reply #12 on: August 11, 2010, 05:27:13 AM »
I started looking for definitions of the word "latticino" because the word is used quite a lot and I've never been sure exactly what it means. I tried the online sources that I trust the most, first Barovier and Toso's online dictionary of glass terms, and then the Loschs' visual dictionary of glass techniques. No mention of latticino in either, I started looking through my Murano books, mostly by the big names, and no mention there, some 15 books in fact. Next, I checked Edward Schmid, Advanced Glassworking Technique, which is the best book I've seen for explaining techniques in a way that's helpful to glassblowers and collectors. For example, he has a great section on how the various types of filigrana are made.  

I'll quote, "'Latticino' from Italian latte = milk. 'A style of cane using only white glass color often twisted creating a lattice effect," or so we thought... It's fiction ! For a long time Americans referred to all cane worked pieces incorrectly as 'latticino'. Filigrana is really what we're talking about. The only thing close to latticino is Lattimo - a style of white glass."

Schmid's observations matched my findings exactly. I did find latticino mentioned in one book, Murano Magic,  by an American, Carl Gable. It's a useful book, but he's the least authoritative of the authors I looked at in terms of Murano techniques. The term they all use is filigrana, sometimes extending it to filigrana a ritortoli, the term first used in the 16th Century or zanfirico, the terms adopted in the 19th Century. The colours that are used have no effect on the terms used.

My conclusion? We should stop using the term latticino.

David






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Offline TxSilver

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Re: Black and Copper? Swirl Paperweight ID
« Reply #13 on: August 15, 2010, 09:54:59 PM »
I looked around for some definitions of latticino in various places. All that mentioned color at all said either white or color. I'll defer to the latte- root of the word. If the term latticino originally was intended to refer to only white threads, the term has evolved in popular usage to include color. I don't think we can stop using it because it is one of the main keywords used for Murano glass. We would leave latticino collectors searching through a filigrana jungle.:spls: They might never find their way home.
Anita
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Offline KevinH

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Re: Black and Copper? Swirl Paperweight ID
« Reply #14 on: August 16, 2010, 02:04:53 PM »
I agree with Anita's points about modern usage. To return to a specifically correct usage (even if we could be sure of what that was!) would cause confusion.

There seems to be an American-based modern understanding for "latticino" (or "latticinio"). ... ... And there is also an English-based understanding for "filigree" which, according to some early authors, was the English term for the Italian "filigrana"! Why did the English choose to use the different word? Was it due to museum authorities who perhaps preferred certain terms for 18th century drinking glasses with white or coloured threads ("twists") in the stems?

KevinH


Offline Baked_Beans

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Re: Black and Copper? Swirl Paperweight ID
« Reply #15 on: April 29, 2011, 04:34:27 PM »
Just as a footnote I thought I would add a link to Edward Schmid's website (mentioned above). His books look great reading for anyone interested in glass as David suggested !

http://www.glassmtn.com/press.htm#3

p.s.

An example of his work

 
Mike


 

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