Author Topic: Scratches on a Victorian drinking glass  (Read 1294 times)

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Offline neilh

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Scratches on a Victorian drinking glass
« on: August 22, 2010, 03:26:40 PM »
Hi folks,

Here is a photo of a Manchester drinking glass I picked up this week - Percival Vickers 1870 registration. This is the first item of this type that I have bought. You can see on the photo that there are horizontal scratches above the vertical cuts, which go all around the body of the glass. Does anyone know if this is usual on these types of glasses, or what such scratches may signify? Is it a measurement line of some sort?


Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: Scratches on a Victorian drinking glass
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2010, 03:30:50 PM »
 :-\

If they're inside the glass, they look like watermarks, if they're outside, perhaps on the widest part of the glass, they may have appeared from bumping against other glasses on a shelf.
They don't look like any measurement line, more like damage of some sort. If the glass is valuable, they could be removed - polished out.
Cheers, Sue (M)

Three Wise Women would have asked for directions, arrived on time, delivered the baby, cleaned the stables and made a casserole...

And there WOULD have been peace on earth.


Offline neilh

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Re: Scratches on a Victorian drinking glass
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2010, 04:13:15 PM »
Thanks Sue,

The marks are on the inside of the glass. They are more scuffs than scratches on closer examination. I have tried to clean them off with slight success, so I think a tide line to a certain extent. Maybe it is the cumulative effect of 140 years cleaning leaving a bit of a ring on the inside of the glass.


Offline Paul S.

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Re: Scratches on a Victorian drinking glass
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2010, 04:13:57 PM »
hello Neil  -  I would agree with Sue  -  they do indeed appear to be internal marks caused by water staining, indicating the top water level, and it maybe that this piece was used for something other than a drinking glass.   If you can't feel scratches with your finger nail, you may stand a chance of reducing the marks considerably by the use of something like a metal polish i.e.  Brasso, for example.  If you can feel scratches, then removal is probably a professional job.   Is this piece particularly special - forgive my ignorance. :)  


Offline Paul S.

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Re: Scratches on a Victorian drinking glass
« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2010, 04:21:54 PM »
sorry neil - our posts crossed. :)    Dont' think it would be cleaning that caused the marks  -  possible the chemicals in the water.    All water, if left in a glass container will, over time, leave a residue around the inside (more noticeable at the very top level of the liquid), which usually shows up as 'whitish'.   You might be lucky - with elbow grease and time, you should be able to remove 90 odd percent of the marks.    Anyone know is hard or soft water is more prone to leaving rings?  Is the Manchester area soft water?


Offline Max

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Re: Scratches on a Victorian drinking glass
« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2010, 04:31:08 PM »
Water staining like that is usually permanent and is where the water has actually eaten into the surface of the glass. No amount of cleaning will remove it (as the glass surface is spoiled) and the piece will have to be repaired professionally, which can be expensive.   :'(

I am not a man


Offline Anne

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Re: Scratches on a Victorian drinking glass
« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2010, 05:08:03 PM »
Manchester water is usually soft - it comes from the Lake District 96 miles (154km) to the north via the Thirlmere Aqueduct.


Offline Paul S.

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Re: Scratches on a Victorian drinking glass
« Reply #7 on: August 22, 2010, 05:16:22 PM »
Whilst there are big difficulties in removing scratches - also as Max says, glass that has become etched is often beyond the pale, to quote neil........'so I think a tide line to a certain extent'.    Generally, tide marks/lines can often be removed (sometimes as much as 95%) - when using chemicals, power sources and much patience.  It does depend of course for how long the staining/etching has be working on the glass.   I think you may be resigned to having to live with some of the problem, unless you do go professional, but it really is worth the effort to try and see how you get on, please do keep us informed.    Often the worst culprits are the almost unseen deep scratches.   Somewhere on the board (using the 'search') there should be notes to help you regarding removal of staining/scratches etc.

thanks Anne  -  I see neil is posting from south Hampshire :-[  but maybe his glass spent most of its life up north. :)


Offline neilh

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Re: Scratches on a Victorian drinking glass
« Reply #8 on: August 22, 2010, 05:31:04 PM »
Thanks for the tips guys. I might try a little polish on it. I suspect the marks may partially go with a little determined cleaning. And yep, I'm a Manchester lad stuck in south Hampshire - I don't know where the glass has been though!


Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: Scratches on a Victorian drinking glass
« Reply #9 on: August 22, 2010, 05:51:25 PM »
 :o

Gentle and determined. The determination must be exercised on your patience.
It must be gentle, because you don't want to cause any stresses to happen in the glass.

I did read in a "How to; tips for around the household" sort of book, (fairly old) which said;

"....that with a chamois leather cloth, rubbing in one direction only, one should be able to remove a small scratch from glass in about three weeks..."

I don't know if you're allowed any loo breaks.... :spls:
Cheers, Sue (M)

Three Wise Women would have asked for directions, arrived on time, delivered the baby, cleaned the stables and made a casserole...

And there WOULD have been peace on earth.

 

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