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Author Topic: Richardson's Vitrified Opaline  (Read 2231 times)

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Offline flying free

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Re: Richardson's Vitrified Opaline
« Reply #20 on: March 14, 2023, 10:49:20 PM »
In Baguiers et Verres a Boire, Leon Darnis, on page 165 there is a goblet from Clichy. I think it has the same star cut and overlay foot but it's blue.
Also page 160 and 161 shows 4 items with white overlay.  Similar feel and style to yours. Different makers but they are all graphic design white overlay on clear.
One is from Clichy with a similar star cut foot and white overlay on that one.  The design of the overlay is also spare and graphic but different to yours. The stems on all of these is a different design to yours. They date from c.1840/50.

Oh ... Stem design match for your goblet on page 172 of book a goblet from Saint Louis.  From that then,also a goblet,with star cut overlay foot but in blue and the star has many more points than yours.  The design of the overlay is like yours but many more arches.   
That said,none of the 4 white overlay versions shown are from Saint Louis.

If you have a UV light what colour does the clear glass give off under that? Is it an orangey salmon tint or yellow?


Looking through the Clichy book, a similar stem design but the way it's applied to the foot is different. That could be because the foot on that bowl is cupped upward though.  Page 313.

m

Offline cagney

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Re: Richardson's Vitrified Opaline
« Reply #21 on: March 15, 2023, 10:29:07 PM »
  Wether American or European the goblet no longer in my possession. Sold all the better glass in my collection back in 2010. That financial crisis back then. I did archive them in digital photos. The goblet did test positive for lead under shortwave UV.

  One recurring problem with attribution of American glassware of the finer type in the first half of the 19th century other than pressed glass is the influence of English,French and sometimes German workmen induced to immigrate by the glass companies. Thomas Pears of Bakewell made several trips to England and the continent to find [pilfer?] skilled workmen even tho it was illegal to do so at the time in England. He would also acquire examples of glassware in the newest fashion.
 
 

Offline flying free

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Re: Richardson's Vitrified Opaline
« Reply #22 on: March 15, 2023, 11:08:03 PM »
Ah, ok, I'll stop noticing similar items then :)

The 'acquiring' of fashionable glass I think is/would have been quite normal.  It's important to see what the competition is doing and to be able to make comparable items if so desired. 

Also, in the days where competitively priced glass was being imported from other countries and there was a local industry that could compete in manufacturing terms, I can imagine that having examples in order to produce locally in whatever country, would have been seen as a necessity. 

I've seen and read some odd things in older literature about glass being found at a makers site or in a family collection,or from the collection of said maker - now knowing that the carefully treasured glass has turned out to be Bohemian/French or by another maker.

 

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