Author Topic: Is it worth buying?  (Read 754 times)

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Offline Hourglass

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Is it worth buying?
« on: September 25, 2010, 02:25:22 PM »
Contemplating this 3" weight described as 'Murano Latticino'. It's up for £45. Is it a good one for the price?



Offline Max

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Re: Is it worth buying?
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2010, 04:39:38 PM »
I don't know much about paperweights, but it seems to me that a word to help you search for yourself on Google would be Latticino.   Whether you think something is 'good for the price' is up to how much you like it really.  ;)


I am not a man


Offline tropdevin

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Re: Is it worth buying?
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2010, 04:40:23 PM »
***

It looks like a reasonable example - but as for price....you pay what you feel it is worth to you! To be a bit more helpful, I would say that over the past 3 or 4 years I have seen very similar weights sell for as little as £10, and, to be fair, a few sell for more than £45. So I don't think £45 is a ridiculuous figure to be asking.

Generally, I sense a gradual increase in the sale price of the older Murano weights (that is to say, ones made up to the end of the 1960s): but that may just be 'the statistics of small numbers'.

Alan
Alan
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt."  Abraham Lincoln.

The comments in this posting reflect the opinion of the author, Alan Thornton, and not that of the owners, administrators or moderators of this board. Comments are copyright Alan Thornton.
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Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: Is it worth buying?
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2010, 05:22:56 PM »
I always go by my guts and how much I like a piece - if I don't know it's provenance, I work out roughly how much it would have cost to make - given the expertise of the maker, (and how long it took to get it) their time involved, the materials and the fuel.
Sure, marked or labelled provenance, signatures etc. always add a premium to a price I'm not always prepared to pay.
Cheers, Sue (M)

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Offline cfosterk

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Re: Is it worth buying?
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2010, 09:32:26 PM »
If it was a John Deacons crown the price would be at least £65, Cape cod or Perthshire examples at least double that, St Louis modern examples low hundreds, antiques around four figures.....

I think some Murano pieces are valued too lowly and this is a nice example.

At the end of the day, if you like it and its a reasonable price, go for it!!!



Offline Hourglass

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Re: Is it worth buying?
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2010, 09:53:57 PM »
I decided against buying it although it did look nice. I went to the local monthly antiques fair today and bought 9 weights for not a lot more than that one was up for, a big Murano close pack cane, a big Mdina yellowish green with feint brown swirls and two 'ghost' bubbles, (one inside the other giving a silvery sheen) a Langham, a small Guernsey 'Island Glass' weight, a small clear with a very thin dark blue spiral maked on the base 'Pearl of Archadia 2005', looks like the style of engraving as CG but no makers mark/name. A large deep blue with white swirls engraved (or more like scratched) signature on the base Thompson 186, a medium with what looks like 'Mtfara' on the base and two others that I still need to identify. Will post up a pic of them if anyone would like to see them.


 

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