Author Topic: A rare Whitefriars 'find' in Cambridge this weekend  (Read 488 times)

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Offline Leni

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A rare Whitefriars 'find' in Cambridge this weekend
« on: September 27, 2010, 10:26:12 AM »
We went to Cambridge the day before the glass fair to stay with friends, and wandering around a charity shop I spotted this rare (yes, I think I am really justified in using the 'R' word this time ;) ;D) Whitefriars vase.   

It is from the experimental range designed by Baxter in 1961 to use up the white enamel from thermometer tubes on blue or red glass.  This proved difficult, due to incompatibility of the enamel and the glass, and the range was quickly discontinued.  The vase I found is an uncatalogued shape, but it can be seen in the photo of Baxter with this range which is in the Lesley Jackson WF book on page 87. 

When we found the vase we thought it had water damage, but on washing it I found it was only dust!  However, it does have a small (about 1cm) internal annealing fracture - a symptom of the incompatibility of the two materials, and one reason the range was abandoned - and a couple of tiny burst bubbles on the surface, which have obviously been there since it was made. 

I don't collect this sort of WF so I shall be 'moving it on', but  my question is this: should I get the burst bubbles polished out, or should I let anyone who buys the vase decide whether they want to have it done or not?  I know nothing can be done about the annealing fracture, but this is something which I personally wouldn't be too worried about as I feel it's intrinsic to the 'history' of this vase, and indeed to the experimental nature of the range, although I know it would put some collectors off.  However, if it were me I would leave the bubbles since they have been there from when it was made.  But I would love to know what do other glass collectors think?  To polish, or not to polish?  Do it before sale, or point it out and leave the decision to the buyer? :-\

Help and advice most welcome, please.

Thanks  :)
Leni


Offline glassobsessed

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Re: A rare Whitefriars 'find' in Cambridge this weekend
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2010, 04:03:22 PM »
Leave it in it's original state, if the buyer wants to desecrate it it will be their choice! Once you start making alterations by grinding and polishing part of something away you can not then put it back into it's original state, the process is not reversible.

John


Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: A rare Whitefriars 'find' in Cambridge this weekend
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2010, 04:39:20 PM »
I agree. And the damage sounds pretty minimal anyway.

But you know how wfs collectors view their glass more than I do, Leni.

It really shouldn't detract from it's value in my opinion. As you say, it's simply part of it's history.
Cheers, Sue (M)

“All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.” Friedrich Nietzsche


Offline Anne

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Re: A rare Whitefriars 'find' in Cambridge this weekend
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2010, 05:31:47 PM »
Leave it as is, perhaps those burst bubbles were also as a result of the problems with the making of the piece, so are as much a part of its history as the annealing crack.


Offline Leni

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Re: A rare Whitefriars 'find' in Cambridge this weekend
« Reply #4 on: September 27, 2010, 05:48:22 PM »
Thank you all for your advice.  I've decided I think I shall leave it as it is.  If I eventually sell it, it will be for the buyer to decide if they want to have anything done to remove the bubbles.  Thanks everyone  :kissy:

However, I have been told I was wrong to refer to this as 'experimental'!  Apparently, since it is in an uncatalogued shape it should be called a 'frigger'  :spls: 

Sorry if I've confused anyone!  :-[
Leni


Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: A rare Whitefriars 'find' in Cambridge this weekend
« Reply #5 on: September 27, 2010, 06:04:29 PM »
Unfortunately these days, such a word has........ xxxxx-rated connotations. :wsh:

Personally, I'd only use it of very old glass, apprentice pieces for showing off in the parades.
But best stick to wfs conventions as that's what it is.
Cheers, Sue (M)

“All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.” Friedrich Nietzsche


Offline Leni

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Re: A rare Whitefriars 'find' in Cambridge this weekend
« Reply #6 on: September 27, 2010, 06:35:03 PM »
"You say tomayto and I say tomarto"   >:D  ;)  :24:
Leni


Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: A rare Whitefriars 'find' in Cambridge this weekend
« Reply #7 on: September 27, 2010, 06:37:44 PM »
but I say tomato. Honest!  :-*

It's a very lovely piece, by the way.
Cheers, Sue (M)

“All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.” Friedrich Nietzsche


 

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