Author Topic: what do you think?  (Read 1110 times)

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Offline RAY

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what do you think?
« on: December 20, 2005, 05:27:47 PM »
MMMmmm, i think is glass is not English, the engraving don't seem right , I've had glasses in the same design with the air twist which were made in Bohemia i think someone has had this glass engraved the seller also has another glass but diffrent engraving, that's just my thought

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=7376232584&ssPageName=STRK:MEWA:IT
cheers Ray


Offline chuggy

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what do you think?
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2005, 06:27:15 PM »
I've dealt a fair bit with this seller over the last couple of years and everything I've ever had has been spot on, and I do regard him as one of the best on e-bay.
Paul
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Offline paradisetrader

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what do you think?
« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2005, 11:38:19 PM »
I don't feel able to comment on this engraved item as I just have so little knowledge of that type of glass.

I don't think it's a question of honesty here but I note that the seller deals in a wide range of antiques and I do find that such dealers can be woefully ignorant on glass.

This piece seems to be mis-described :  http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Victorian-Italian-Ribbed-Wrythen-Graal-Goblet-NR_W0QQitemZ7375674783
Looks more like 50s to me and I cannot imagine what technique (similar to graal) he is referring to. I don't think the use of the term "wrythen" is correct either is it ?
Pete


Offline Bernard C

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what do you think?
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2005, 02:10:00 AM »
Quote from: "paradisetrader"
I don't think it's a question of honesty here but I note that the seller deals in a wide range of antiques and I do find that such dealers can be woefully ignorant on glass.

Peter, an interesting observation.    Their lack of knowledge of glass can sometimes be an important factor in deciding to buy from them.   At least you can be reasonably sure that the glass item is 100% legitimate.   I have bought several important items from such dealers, including two thirds of a Walsh crackle fish garniture set (he was offering them separately, but the fish and tall candlestick came from the same mantelpiece), and a disassembled Davidson Good Companion table lamp (I had to bribe the dealer to go home with my pencilled sketch to find the missing bits).

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline KevinH

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what do you think?
« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2005, 02:34:00 AM »
On the "Ribbed-wrythen-graal" question, I would say the item was "decorated in spiralling alternate blue a white strips", but I suppose there could well be an Itailian term for such a technique.

I don't think its "graal" of any type. And my understanding of "wrythen" is that it refers specifically to 'raised moulded lines in a spiralling or swirling pattern' - as on the bowls of some old drinking glasses.
KevinH


Offline aa

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what do you think?
« Reply #5 on: December 21, 2005, 10:22:15 AM »
Quote from: "paradisetrader"
I don't think it's a question of honesty here but I note that the seller deals in a wide range of antiques and I do find that such dealers can be woefully ignorant on glass.


I entirely agree with Peter, but "Eagle-eyed" Ray is very good at spotting this sort of thing. It is always very difficult to tell from a photograph and if you had it in your hands you would know instantly. But my money would be on Ray! :D

As to the Graal mis-description....it's a bit like someone looking at a print and saying that it is similar to a painting!

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Offline paradisetrader

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what do you think?
« Reply #6 on: December 21, 2005, 03:54:39 PM »
Bernard
Thank you. It's interesting that you concur.

Kev
Quote
...my understanding of "wrythen" is that it refers specifically to 'raised moulded lines in a spiralling or swirling pattern' - as on the bowls of some old drinking glasses.

Exactly so, thank you and so much better put than I could have done.

Back to the original item...
I note the seller doesn't actually say it's English but of course if isn't then ...what ? where ? and when ? become more perlexing questions. But perhaps there are some explanataion(s).

Ray, isn't it possible that the blank was Czech / Bohemian even back then ? Then the engraving done here in England ?
The only comment I have on the glass is that it seems surprisingly thick.

What is it about the engraving that doesn't seem right to you ?

I would have thought that some historical research into excise revolts would bring up at least a broad timeframe to which the engraving purports to refer. Going by the bidding it would seem that at least some bidders think they know.
Pete


 

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