Author Topic: Bohemian facetting - but ...  (Read 1191 times)

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Offline Wuff

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Bohemian facetting - but ...
« on: November 28, 2010, 11:21:18 AM »
The facetting of this weight reminds me of Bohemian (in the widest sense) paperweights - but the canes don't seem to fit, at least I have never seen a Bohemian weight with this type of cane arrangement. What is it? The base is flat and polished: the different lengths of the canes can easily been seen. I cannot measure specific gravity right now, but estimate it from dimensions and weight to be around 3 (i.e. lead crystal): max. diameter 95 mm / height 79 mm / weight 1032 g.
Wolf Seelentag, St.Gallen
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Offline tropdevin

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Re: Bohemian facetting - but ...
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2010, 04:02:38 PM »
***

Hi Wuff

Any chance it is a modern piece by the Polish glassworker / paperweight maker Tomasz Gondek?  I have seen some of his work that is very similar in style to antique Boho, but more vibrant colours.

Alan
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Offline alexander

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Re: Bohemian facetting - but ...
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2010, 11:20:04 PM »
The canes appear to be Muranese, but I don't know if that helps.

A nice weight   :)
Alexander
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Offline Wuff

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Re: Bohemian facetting - but ...
« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2010, 08:44:40 PM »
Any chance it is a modern piece by the Polish glassworker / paperweight maker Tomasz Gondek?  I have seen some of his work that is very similar in style to antique Boho, but more vibrant colours.

Thank you for the suggestion, Alan. I agree it will likely not be very old: base is too clean, unless recently re-polished.
I have googled Tomasz Gondek and found useful images mainly on two sites ...
http://www.millefiori.pl/: Several weights, but single oblique views only: canes not very clearly shown, but look somewhat different; also none of the weights is faceted at all.
https://www.westerncoloradopublishing.com/: One weight only, but several views, including the base - which is etch-marked (my weight is not marked).
Conclusion - I consider Tomasz Gondek not very likely just now.
Then I checked for Silesian millefiori paperweights: some antique ones include canes which are somewhat similar, but then ....

The canes appear to be Muranese, but I don't know if that helps.

.... I have to agree with this - thought it myself. With Murano canes being sold all over the place, however, this does not mean, the weight was made there. What about the type of facetting? Does anyone have examples of Murano weights with similar facetting?

Anyway - I would like to follow the line of Silesian (Polish) weights. The man to be asked about antique ones would certainly be Marek Kordasiewicz - would he also be the one to be asked about modern ones? I'd like to find out - would anyone have contact details (possibly by mail - see mail button on the lefthand side).

Talking of the canes: would these (my weight) be complex canes, or just clustered when setting up the millefiori? The uneven lengths in some "clusters" seem to indicate individual simple canes - but would they be melted together as closely as the weight suggests?
Wolf Seelentag, St.Gallen
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Offline Frank

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Re: Bohemian facetting - but ...
« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2010, 09:58:17 PM »
What is odd, points to modern I guess, is that the fancy edged windows are nicely polished but the pattern cuts are left unpolished. Presumably deliberately.
Frank A.
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Offline KevinH

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Re: Bohemian facetting - but ...
« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2010, 12:03:42 AM »
Quote
Talking of the canes: would these (my weight) be complex canes, or just clustered when setting up the millefiori? The uneven lengths in some "clusters" seem to indicate individual simple canes - but would they be melted together as closely as the weight suggests?
The canes that make up the "clusters" are complex canes, but the "clusters" are created by placing the complex canes in that pattern. If the "clusters" were formed as a complex cane, I would have expected some evidence of the join between the pre-formed clear needed to hold them together and the gathered clear used to encase them. Also, with a pre-formed complex cane cluster there would have more precision in the overall structure of the cluster because of the clear glass holding them together.

For anyone not familiar with complex cane structures, the following might give an idea of the work that goes into making up some complex canes:

In the weight, lookimg at the "brown and yellow" around "blue and yellow" group, the "brown and yellow" cane is a complex structure of (at least): a central green element surrounded by several white (?) rods, which is coated in clear glass then surrounded by yellow-over-white rods (or "plates") and again covered in clear, followed by larger yellow-over-green "plates" which are then coated in brown and the whole formed as a "six-leaf daisy" pattern. The "blue and yellow" cane starts with a yellow rod, then clear, then yellow rods surround it, followed by clear then more yellow rods and another layer of clear then white coated with blue which is formed in a rib mould with probably twenty-four teeth.
KevinH

Offline Wuff

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Re: Bohemian facetting - but ...
« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2010, 06:53:09 PM »
Thank you for the clarification, Kevin - I guess we both mean the same, I just used the same word ("simple cane") in a different, not quite correct way - I meant "single cane" (which is complex, as it was made in several steps). But we seem to agree that the "clusters" are formed by several "single complex" canes - rather than being a single "very complex" cane - hope this is clearer now :huh:.
Wolf Seelentag, St.Gallen
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Offline n_bonaparte

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Re: Bohemian facetting - but ...
« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2010, 07:52:01 PM »
Hello Wolf,
I'm very sure that it is a vintage Murano.

kind regards
Andreas

Offline casalibre

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Re: Bohemian facetting - but ...
« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2010, 10:16:04 PM »
Hi Andreas!
Whats about the arguments for being Murano?

 

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