Author Topic: Glen, remember me saying I was going to buy Carnival, well..  (Read 1926 times)

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Offline BJB

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Glen, remember me saying I was going to buy Carnival, well..
« on: January 03, 2006, 02:17:44 PM »
..here is my newest buy, not quite orange,as the base colour is amethyst, but it does have an orange glow :lol:

Its not marked anywhere so I've no idea who made it or when, but its a little comport thing, with a huge burst airbubble on the side which I didn't notice until I got it home :(

Can you help with identification, but knowing me it was made last week in some Shang-Hi sweat shop :wink:


http://tinypic.com/jkxa34.jpg ......................top

http://tinypic.com/jkxag5.jpg ................pattern

http://tinypic.com/jkxao9.jpg ................... base

Many thanks,
Barbara


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Offline Glen

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Glen, remember me saying I was going to buy Carnival, well..
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2006, 08:13:59 PM »
Oh, it's beautiful Barbara. Congratulations on an exquisite piece. It's Classic era Carnival Glass, dating from the early days, and it was made by Fenton (who recently celebrated their centenary). The pattern is "Holly" (some collectors also refer to it as "Carnival Holly"). It is, as you note, a stemmed comport.

The colour is actually rather hard to be certain of. It does look amethyst, but of course, different monitors show colours differently. For a moment I even suspected it might be red! Can you take a photo of it outside sometime? Hold it up to the light and show me the pedestal base, if you can.

A beautiful piece. Congratulations.

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood


Offline BJB

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Glen, remember me saying I was going to buy Carnival, well..
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2006, 08:53:27 PM »
Hi Glen,

Thank you so much for the info, its only a little piece just 4" tall and 4.5" wide and even my OH likes it :D

I've held it up to the kitchen light and its odd, the rim of the base looks purple but it seems to have a reddish tinge nearer the middle. I'll try and take a picture of the base lit by the halogen bulb in the conservatory which should show it up. I can't see us getting any sunny days in the near future :(

Thanks once again, I'm working my way towards orange... honest

Barbara


Offline David555

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Glen, remember me saying I was going to buy Carnival, well..
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2006, 01:27:47 AM »
Hi Barbara

I think it is lovely as well, you can see lots of information on David Doty's site - I know Glen has a fantastic site but this David's site is like an endless library on Carnival. As you will see there are a lot of colours to collect not just in the Fenton Holly pattern but in the 'Fenton Holly Pattern Compote' section alone. There is extra information by the compote info by 'Alan and Lorraine Pickup' who seem to have specialised in collecting these and are missing a few very rare ones.

Barbara, when you say you are working your way towards orange, do you mean 'marigold'. I love this colour but it is the most common colour and your amethyst one is much more valuable. I see that a 'red opal’ colour is quoted as being worth up to $1,600

http://www.ddoty.com/holly.html

Glen, how do you rate David Doty's site. I see it as one of the most comprehensive guides (maybe it's just that wow factor), why would I buy a book when he seems to cover so much, although you have tidied up little details he has left out (Windmill pattern variations) for me in the past!

Do you know him, how has he put together such a massive database and how does he support it? If the question is out of order, just ignore it. I know you have as much knowledge and experience and I always ask you on GMB rather emailing the site as 1) he states he does not respond, 2) it is so vast with so many entries, I sometimes get lost in it :oops:

Adam P
David is my Father's name, 555 is the number of man ('The Pixies'), but please call me ADAM P.


Offline BJB

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Glen, remember me saying I was going to buy Carnival, well..
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2006, 07:56:14 AM »
Hi Adam P,

Yes I mean Marigold, and as to why I find it hard to "like" is a woman thing. When I was pregnant with first daughter, little things used to set off the dreaded morning sickness, and as well as the ususal tea, coffee cuppa soup etc was the pair of marigold carnival glass plates my mum had on her wall. I don't know why, but I only had to catch sight of them and, well you get the idea. I have disliked all carnival glass since, but hated marigold with a passion :lol: , so I'm working towards a "cure" and decided to start with a small easy pretty colour and take it "a day at a time" :wink:

Barbara.

That site is lovely, really useful and have added it to my favorites


Offline David555

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Glen, remember me saying I was going to buy Carnival, well..
« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2006, 01:07:50 AM »
Barbara   LOL  :)  :)  :)

You always make me smile :D in a good way that is, with your anecdotes and stories.

I am thinking the more you work yourself towards a cure the cheaper the carnival will be as 'Marigold' is usually the least expensive in a range.

Have you thought of 'Clambroth' that is on a par with Marigold price wise but lightly iridized a yellow/orange colour?. I have some that is almost clear.

Meanwhile below is a Holly pattern basket, medium sized in amethyst. I actually can't see it on Doty's site, but I am sure it is Fenton - unless Glen knows otherwise. I have a few pieces of carnival I will show later, actually I have few bits of all types of glass :!: that comes from all the bits I couldn't part with when I was dealing.

(http://img498.imageshack.us/img498/2915/canivalfen3bv.th.jpg)

Thanks

Adam P :P  :P
David is my Father's name, 555 is the number of man ('The Pixies'), but please call me ADAM P.


Offline Glen

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Glen, remember me saying I was going to buy Carnival, well..
« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2006, 09:15:53 AM »
The photo above is of a Fenton "Pepper Plant" hat shape. It is "related" to the "Holly" hat.

I researched it, in depth, and wrote about it some ten years ago. My work is here.
http://www.geocities.com/carni_glass_uk_2000/pepper.html

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood


Offline David555

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Glen, remember me saying I was going to buy Carnival, well..
« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2006, 04:35:47 PM »
Glen that is amazing, you really do know your stuff - amazing research, I never saw it on your site last night.

As a novice I have been under the impression it was some sort of 'Holly' although looking at pictures on some sites yesterday I noticed a more angular nature to the stalks on the 'Holly' pattern I was seeing, you can see it on Barbara's piece quite clearly?

They do look so alike until you point out the differences '"Two variations on the same theme'

So by Fenton, but 'Pepper Plant', I can see why it's called a 'hat shape' I love this shape its so deco with the flat panelled sides.

I bought two of these about a year ago quite cheaply and wondered why when I sold one on eBay it went for a surprising amount. I say this because I have sold comparable Fenton Holly pattern pieces for a lot less.

Thanks again for sharing your wisdom

Adam P
 :D  :D
David is my Father's name, 555 is the number of man ('The Pixies'), but please call me ADAM P.


Offline Glen

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Glen, remember me saying I was going to buy Carnival, well..
« Reply #8 on: January 07, 2006, 04:44:30 PM »
In response to some of the questions raised here, I have just written an article on marigold Carnival and its variations. I'll write the first part of the text below:

Marigold was the first Carnival colour to be produced. It is unusual in that (unlike most other Carnival colours) the base glass is actually clear and the golden orange colouring comes from the iridescence only. I know some collectors who only collect marigold - they adore it, and their entire display glows with the rich golden hues, contrasted against dark display shelving (which is pretty much how it would originally have been seen/displayed in the early 1900s).

But marigold is a whimsical and often capricious colour. Once upon a time, marigold was marigold. And that was it. But then collectors (and auctioneers and dealers) began to differentiate between the shades and tones of marigold. Certain variations and depths of marigold are undoubtedly more appealing to the eye (and the check book). And so pumpkin marigold and pastel marigold became identified as Carnival colours (well, colour variations, really) in their own right.

Pumpkin Marigold
Like regular marigold and pastel marigold, pumpkin is also found on clear base glass. And there the similarity stops. For pumpkin marigold is deep, rich and loaded with vibrant dark tones, unlike the delicate shimmering of pastel marigold (see further on for a fuller description) - and unlike the flatter mid tones of regular marigold. It is richly loaded with reds and highlighted with purples, gold and blue-greens. The name describes it perfectly - pumpkin - a visual stimulus for easy recognition.

Most manufacturers made examples of pumpkin - but they are not common. A top notch, vibrant pumpkin can raise temperatures at auctions faster than a heatwave in July. I know - I’ve been there (my “undoing” came in the form of a Pumpkin Poppy Show plate!)

Pastel Marigold
Pastel marigold is also found on clear base glass. If you hold the item up to the light you will see that it has an orange colouring, but you will not notice the astonishing  iridescent effects when you have it in that position. When the light comes from the front onto pastel marigold, that’s when you will see the color effects begin. And when you hold it against a darker background you will see a magical transformation. Pink, purple, fuchsia, blue, green, aqua, turquoise, gold. Every one of them - in a shimmering, butterfly wing effect. Turn it this way and that and watch, transfixed, as the colors change.


I won't bore you with any more here. In the full article I also explain clambroth, peach opal, pale marigold and address two further issues - is marigold always cheap, and where did the term "marigold" originate? There are several photos, including two that I hope, fully describe the magical quality of pastel marigold iridescence.

The complete article is here
http://www.geocities.com/carni_glass_uk_2000/OrangeStuff.html
or you can access it via my Home Page (url below).

Glen

© G & S Thistlewood, 2006
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood


Offline Glen

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Glen, remember me saying I was going to buy Carnival, well..
« Reply #9 on: January 07, 2006, 04:57:35 PM »
Quote from: "David555"
Glen ...... you really do know your stuff


I sure hope so. I've been collecting Carnival Glass for over 20 years; researching and writing for 16 or so years; written three major, hard back books on the subject; produced a Carnival Glass journal for 8 years; produced two videos on Carnival Glass; immediate past President of wwwcga (World Wide Web Carnival Glass Association); joint Mailing List editor and Educational Adviser for wwwcga; given lectures and seminars in the USA and UK, and written countless articles on Carnival worldwide. Oh yes, I also have a website that features our current research work.

 :lol:  :lol:  :lol:

Glen
Just released—Carnival from Finland & Norway e-book!
Also, Riihimäki e-book and Carnival from Sweden e-book.
Sowerby e-books—three volumes available
For all info see www.thistlewoods.net
Copyright G&S Thistlewood

 

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