No-one likes general adverts, and ours hadn't been updated for ages, so we're having a clear-out and a change round to make the new ones useful to you. These new adverts bring in a small amount to help pay for the board and keep it free for you to use, so please do use them whenever you can, Let our links help you find great books on glass or a new piece for your collection. Thank you for supporting the Board.

Author Topic: The best 20th century glass book for the beginner?  (Read 1248 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Lustrousstone

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 12910
  • Gender: Female
    • Warrington, UK
    • My Gallery
Re: The best 20th century glass book for the beginner?
« Reply #10 on: January 07, 2011, 02:43:16 PM »
To be honest you're not going to find one book for that. There are/were 100s and 100s of glass companies out there that export/ed glass worldwide. The only way is to read as many books as possible, read the posts on here, search the Internet, join other boards, handle as much glass as possible and take ebay and shop attributions with a bucket of salt unless you can verify them elsewhere. There is no easy answer.

The only certainty is that glass can become addictive...

Support the Glass Message Board by finding a book via book-seek.com


Offline 8ootneck

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 15
  • Gender: Male
Re: The best 20th century glass book for the beginner?
« Reply #11 on: January 07, 2011, 03:09:25 PM »
Thanks Lustrousstone i will take everything you said on board,thanks once again for quick reply.

Support the Glass Message Board by finding glass through glass-seek.com


Offline astrid

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 683
  • Gender: Female
    • Astrid's glass collection on Picasa
Re: The best 20th century glass book for the beginner?
« Reply #12 on: January 07, 2011, 04:11:10 PM »
Unless you want to deal in glass, the best way to feel comfortable on what to spend on a piece of glass to me is the following:

- Do I think this is a good quality piece of glass that I like and think is beautiful?
- Do I think the price asked is reasonable for the amount of appreciation I have for it?
- If the answer to both pieces is yes, then buy it.

To avoid the mistake of really overpaying, I limited what I spent on a single item initially until I'd learned more about what I really want to collect and what the prices of those pieces generally were. And as with any form of collecting, I guess, if it really makes me cry out "It must be mine!" and I can afford it easily, I just go for it, even if I don't know exactly for what price I'd be able to find it if I'd wait half a year or so. Since I still rarely buy anything over 50 euro, I don't mind if I 'overspend' by 5 or 10 euro, that's just the price of passion and collecting I guess...

After all, every computer I every bought would have been cheaper if I'd waited another few months in buying it, and every piece of really nice clothing is too expensive when it is part of the 'new collection'. It doesn't mean automatically I regret having bought those items at full price...

Astrid

***

Have a look at my collection online and see if you can set me straight on my identifications : http://picasaweb.google.nl/102861706167408125672

Support the Glass Message Board by finding a book via book-seek.com


Offline chopin-liszt

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 12340
    • Scotland
Re: The best 20th century glass book for the beginner?
« Reply #13 on: January 07, 2011, 05:05:52 PM »
You have more money for glass if you buy second-hand clothes - while searching for bits of glass in charity shops!

To work out whether or not a bit of glass is overpriced, I generally try to work out how much it would have cost to make - in terms of the maker's training and years of experience, the complexity of the piece, fuel, location and materials.
And how much I can or can't live without it.

The more you learn about how glass is made, the better the feel you get for how good a piece is.

Go and watch every glassmaker you can find at work. (there are loads of places - and it's fascinating)
Cheers, Sue (M)

"Cherish those that seek the truth;
 Beware of them who find it."
Grimm.

Support the Glass Message Board by finding glass through glass-seek.com


Offline 8ootneck

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 15
  • Gender: Male
Re: The best 20th century glass book for the beginner?
« Reply #14 on: January 07, 2011, 05:37:03 PM »
Thanks very much for your replies astrid and chopin-liszt,i suppose you have got to start some where and it will be a learning curve hopefully not an expensive one,also will have to purchase some books that was mentioned and also study the pieces on this website,thanks again.

Support the Glass Message Board by finding a book via book-seek.com


Offline chopin-liszt

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 12340
    • Scotland
Re: The best 20th century glass book for the beginner?
« Reply #15 on: January 07, 2011, 05:45:44 PM »
Where on the planet are you?
Perhaps we can point you in the direction of glassmakers who are working nearby, so you can go and watch them.

You could also try your local library to see if they have any of these books mentioned in stock - that way you could get a different one and just borrow the ones there - or at least get a good idea of how much you like the book.
While Lesley Jackson's is called "Factory Glass" - it does take studios in under that, although not really individuals. It devotes a small section to each maker covered - well-illustrated.
Cheers, Sue (M)

"Cherish those that seek the truth;
 Beware of them who find it."
Grimm.

Support the Glass Message Board by finding glass through glass-seek.com


Offline 8ootneck

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 15
  • Gender: Male
Re: The best 20th century glass book for the beginner?
« Reply #16 on: January 07, 2011, 06:05:50 PM »
Hi chopin-liszt,i now live in whitley- bay tyne and wear and my home town is Campbeltown in scotland,thanks.

Support the Glass Message Board by finding a book via book-seek.com


Offline Anne

  • GMB Tech Support Manager & "Board (never bored) Dame"
  • Global Moderator
  • Members
  • *
  • Posts: 13546
  • Gender: Female
  • I has a stick to poke the server with yes!
    • Glass trinket sets
    • Cumbria England
    • My Glass Collection
Re: The best 20th century glass book for the beginner?
« Reply #17 on: January 08, 2011, 01:29:55 AM »
As you're up in the north-east it'd be worth spending a little time in some of your local museums. That was a major glassmaking area and many of them have good collections of locally made glass. Also, pay a visit to the National Glass Centre at Sunderland if you can. http://www.nationalglasscentre.com They have exhibitions - there's nothing like seeing the glass closeup to get a feel for it. Books can only help so far, after that it's handling and watching and comparing that will help you learn. If you ever manage to get down to the Midlands (or if you fancy an expedition) make a visit to the Broadfield House Glass Museum http://www.dudley.gov.uk/leisure-and-culture/museums--galleries/glass-museum where you will learn so much from what they have on display too. It all helps. ;)
Cheers! Anne, da tekniqual wizzerd
~ Glass Trinket Sets ~ GlassLinks ~ GlasSpeak ~ GlassGallery 
 ~  Glassoholic Blog ~ Glassoholic Gallery ~

Support the Glass Message Board by finding glass through glass-seek.com


Offline 8ootneck

  • Members
  • **
  • Posts: 15
  • Gender: Male
Re: The best 20th century glass book for the beginner?
« Reply #18 on: January 08, 2011, 09:08:58 AM »
Thanks for the info Anne,will have a look into it,thanks again.

Support the Glass Message Board by finding a book via book-seek.com


 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk
Look for glass on
ebay.co.uk
Visit the Glass Encyclopedia
link to glass encyclopedia
Look for glass on
ebay.com (us)
Visit the Online Glass Museum
link to glass museum


This website is provided by Angela Bowey, PO Box 113, Paihia 0247, New Zealand