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Author Topic: Yellow opalescent glass bowl - Henry Johnson, Holborn, RD 30704, 1 August 1885.  (Read 281 times)

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Offline agincourt17

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    • Pressed glass 1840-1900
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A small yellow opalescent pressed glass bowl, with 2 handles and 3 small feet, the exterior of the bowl delicately decorated with flowers and foliage. Rd. No. 30704 inside bowl.
Size: approx height to rim 3 inches (80 mm); diameter at rim 3.5 inches (90 mm).

Strong yellow-green fluorescence under UV light.

(Permission for the re-use of the photo on GMB granted by Lynne Clark).

RD number 30704 was registered by Henry Johnson, Holborn, Glass Maker, on 1 August 1885.

Jenny Thompson (page 132) gives the design description as “moulded glass bowl attached to moulded glass stand”, but this example shows no sign at all of ever having been part of, or attached to, anything.

Henry Johnson also registered :
RD 5418 on 18 April 1884.- “pressed Glass Flower stand rustic pattern and shape”. Registered by Henry Johnson, This was a Class 4 registration (glass, earthenware etc.), and Henry Johnson is listed as being “Glass Manufacturers Agent, of 13 Castle Street, Holborn, [London] EC.”
RD 30345 on 24 July 1885 – moulded glass horseshoe photograph frame.

Does anyone have photos to show of RD 5418 or RD 30345, please?

Does anyone have more information regarding the registrant, especially his links with manufacturers?

Fred.

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Offline agincourt17

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I've just come across another example of the RD 30704 bowl in the same colourway, but here are a few extra snippets of info to add to the topic.

Firstly, the bowl actually has FOUR splayed feet rather than the three I had attributed to it previously - see photos. (Permission to re-use the images on the GMB granted by Simon Crewe).

I still find this RD 30704 bowl to be a bit of a conundrum really in that the overall shape, the shape and angle of the handles, the narrow gadroons or ridges to the base of the bowl, and the four splayed feet are all 'dead ringers' for Sowerby's pattern 1350 and 1350½ posy bowl and sugar basin bowls (both from Sowerby RD 328744 registered on 4 November 1878) - though the RD 30704 bowl's  pictorial decoration is somewhat wider (and, of course, quite different). I have photos of the Sowerby 1350 and 1350½ patterns in Ivory Queen's Ware, marbled opaque glass, and several non-opalescent transparent colours, but the only opalescent glass examples are in clear glass.

As a 'glass manufacturers agent', Henry Johnson was presumably not directly involved in the manufacture of the actual pieces from their designs.

Potential British candidates for manufacturers? - Greener & Co. of Sunderland did produce some of their registered designs in a similar opalescent lemon yellow uranium glass from as early as 1891, as did and Burtles, Tate & Co. of Manchester from around 1885. 
On the other hand, the RD 30704 bowl could have been manufactured overseas (America, Europe etc.).

Castle Street, Holborn, London, had been renamed as Furnival Street by 1893. Furnival Street has been extensively redeveloped , with only a few buildings remaining from the late 19th century or earlier.

From
http://www.mappalondon.com/london/north-east/clerkenwell-map.htm
Quote
click on “View large scale, 3.7MB”. Click on the page to enlarge it.Scroll to the bottom of the page and in the Left Hand margin you’ll see Tooks. Castle Street is next to this and the church of St Andrew Holborn is just to the right on Holborn Hill.This is from Stanford’s Map of London 1862.
From:
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/old-new-london/vol2/pp526-542
Quote
And now crossing the street again we come to Castle Street, which runs from Holborn into Cursitor Street. Its proper name is Castle Yard, perhaps from the name of Castle Inn, on the site of which it is built. Lord Arundel, the great collector of art and antiquities, was living in 1619–20 in "Castle Yard, in Holborn." And here died Lady Davenant, the first wife of Sir William Davenant, the poet.

From:
 http://pubshistory.com/LondonPubs/Holborn/Castle.shtml
Quote
Castle Pub, 26 Castle Street, Holborn
By 1893 the address had changed from 26 Castle Street to 26 Furnival Street, which remains the pub's current address. The pub is believed to have been established in 1541 and it was rebuilt in its current form in 1901.
Fred.



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