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Author Topic: Decanter ish thing with bulges/ribs, amber glass trails/drips sold as Bohemian  (Read 8273 times)

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Offline flying free

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thank you Ivo
hmm, well I don't have that many in the unidentified section and those I do have I love so it stays  :)
thanks again
m

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Offline rosieposie

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It is beautiful and so distinctive m....so I will keep searching....you never know! :X:
Rosie.

When all's said and done, there's nothing left to say or do.  Roger McGough.

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Offline flying free

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thank you Rosie  :sun:

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Offline nigel benson

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Hello,

I think you answer your own question/thought that it could be Gray-Stan when you say the the clear glass ain't right, nor the amber .....and for my money not the pontil mark either. IMHO not Gray-Stan.

Nigel

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Offline flying free

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Many thanks Nigel, I appreciate that very much.  I'm managing to eliminate a fair few at the mo  ;D  Beginning to run out of  countries that I think it might be :24:
m

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Offline flying free

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I sent a pic and description of this to the V&A with a request for help.  They sent a lovely reply back but unfortunately were unable to provide any positive id.  The person who wrote said they didn't recognise it, but that it looked early 20th c, made in a small workshop rather than a factory.  The description of how the dots were made was as follows:
quote from reply (I hope it is ok to quote this as it seemed easier than trying to reword it - mods please could you remove it not? many thanks)
'The piece is blown in an optic (ribbed) mould. The resulting glass bubble would look a bit like a pumpkin. AT this stage, an orange glass thread was wound around it like a spiral. This would only attach to the higher (more expanded) areas of the bubble. It was then reheated and further expanded in the air (without a mound) causing the thread to break up into small sections which eventually became dots.'

So, an possibly an early piece of 'studio' glass  :sun:  I like that!  it fits with my collection.
m


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Offline chopin-liszt

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 :smg:

Hey, that's really interesting info. about the production process - I've got a gorgeous vase with vaguely similar effects - bought at Broadfield House a few years ago, from the resident glassmakers at the time - "Glass FM".
It's a trial piece by Stephen Foster - he signed it for me there and then!

I'll have to post pics and let you see it.
Cheers, Sue (M)

“Empirical evidence on expert opinion shows that it is extremely unreliable”
Ioannidis, (2005), Plos Medicine.

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Offline Cathy B

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m, with regards to the quote, I think it's okay but it would probably be best if you could just ask the author whether they're happy to be quoted? It might help to include their name, if they're happy to go 'on the record'. :)

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Offline flying free

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I have written to ask permission now.  Cathy could you please remove until I hear back from them?  I guess it isn't vital information anyway, but very interesting to have someone elses view on the technique and era/where it may have been made.
Many thanks
so I am curious now - I probably don't know enough at all (in fact I'm sure I don't) but from what I have read, would I be right in thinking  glassmaking was  expensive and difficult to create as a small 'studio' or 'workshop' - therefore I'm wondering where these small workshops my have been in the world?
I've been curious about this ever since I bought an old hyacinth vase.  I'm wondering where they may have been mould blown or handblown if not in a factory with a furness?
m

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Offline Lustrousstone

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I think the person who wrote that actually meant not mainstream, i.e., not someone you would have heard of. Many set ups were small by "factory" standards. Studio glass is a modern term, when you are often talking about relatively small volumes of hot glass in one- or two-man operations. Glass making has been around since before Roman times. I know for a fact that the glass industry in Scotland is over 600 years old. Fuel has always been the issue, which why so many old glass foundries were near the coal fields. Before coal it was wood and the makers often moved when the supply of trees ran out. Some of the very general glass books have good introduction to glassmaking and its history.

So no, what you have is not studio glass.

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