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Author Topic: Decanter ish thing with bulges/ribs, amber glass trails/drips sold as Bohemian  (Read 3495 times)

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Offline Frank

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... Charles Hajdamach's British Glass 1800-1914.
On page 287 there is a bowl (4 3/4"diameter 2 1/4"high) that kind of curves into the base and at the top flares out at the rim - bit like a wide U shape but with curves out at the top if you can imagine - described as ' clear glass bowl with rows of turquoise beads formed by the method outlined by H.Wilkinson in his patent specification of 1905. Stourbridge early 20th century'.   It has 12 ribs.  My decanter does as well.  It reminds me a lot of my decanter - more so than the Graystan pieces which all seem to have more ribs, apart from one piece I have seen.   I think my decanter dates from earlier than the 30's ....I could be wrong  ;D but I just think it does.
m

Looks like a good match, p278 in my copy.
Frank A.
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Offline flying free

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 :-[  278 it is ...apologies to anyone who thought I had my own special copy  ;D
Glad you agree on the closer match  :)
m


Offline Frank

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p.s. patents are not renewable.
Frank A.
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Offline flying free

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You're right, they aren't , and they run for 20 years apparently?  So if the patent was enforced, and it was made by HW, or the glasswork he was at during the patents lifetime, this would bring us to 1925 since he patented the technique in 1905. This would mean it could still fall under Thomas Webbs or the Stourbridge Glass co.  as that was where he was during the patent.

It also means in 1925 or 1926 ( assuming the patent had been enforced ie. no one else was allowed to use it during it's lifetime),  that other companies could have started using this technique openly.
 
Two comments about this -

IN 20th Century British Glass Charles Hajdamach comments that Mrs Graydon Stannus had access to glassmaking facilities from 1922 and that Graystan closed in 1936.

IN British Glass 1800-1914 Charles Hajdamach makes a comment page 278, on discussing HW patent for this particular technique - 'In 1905 H Wilkinson of 10 Dennis Street, Amblecote, adjacent to the back entrance of Thomas Webb glassworks, patented a technique using threaded glass which must have been known to 19th century glassmakers and which is sometimes used by studio glass makers.'

I infer from that last comment, that pieces must have been seen, which had been made using this technique, dating to the 19th century and also from studio glass makers at the time the book was written.  Would that inference be correct?
m


Offline flying free

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If I have read it correctly, the Gray-Stan 'flint dotted enamel' range appeared in a catalogue entitled The History of Gray-Stan glass, which apparently dates to between 1925 and 1928 - source CH 20th Century British Glass page 93 plate 179 description.
m



Offline Frank

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I infer from that last comment, that pieces must have been seen, which had been made using this technique, dating to the 19th century and also from studio glass makers at the time the book was written.  Would that inference be correct?
m

Yes
Frank A.
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Offline flying free

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Thanks  :) - I'm pretty certain this isn't a studio glass piece, however I was wondering if it could have been earlier and I was trying to use the Manganese content and handle shape to narrow down a timeframe somewhat.
m


Offline Ivo

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Ivo
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Offline flying free

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Yup Ivo, I would say same technique.
Interestingly the other vase I came across had this red as the contrast dot as well and they'd given a possible of Orrefors or Stevens and Williams...the vase is a different shape and more controlled (less freeform if you know what I mean, in it's finish) than the one you link to but similar colour and no grading of colour elsewhere on the piece as mine has -
link here  http://www.stylendesign.co.uk/modern/G243.html

Do you know what pontil mark finish they use at Regenhuette  please?  I'm guessing that the one I linked to has some sort of polished pontil mark, which would be what I would expect from Orrefors or STevens and Williams.
m


Offline Ivo

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Personally I am most underwhelmed by an attribution that says "Stevens & Williams OR Orrefors" - it is too close to "whatever".
And as for the finish on the underside, that would pretty much depend on the finish of the neck and the standards of the company. I know little of the glassmakers in and around the Bavarian forest.
Ivo
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