Author Topic: Percival Vickers Biscuit barrel.  (Read 281 times)

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Offline Paul S.

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Percival Vickers Biscuit barrel.
« on: June 05, 2011, 05:30:37 PM »
My only thought really ..........is the lid correct  -  it's quite loose, and probably wouldn't keep biscuits dry.   Of course, I could go the the National Archives at Kew, but hope someone will know.   I don't have access to any pictures, and had a vague thought that these lids were usually glass.      Height is about 5.25", and first registered 1st - 6th March 1878 - and is one of those odd pieces that don't comply with the list of obvious Registry Marks (don't know why).    Sorry the image of the mark is a bit iffy, it's not easy photographing something at the bottom of the barrel  -  the month is 'G' - the year is 'W' - day of the month is '1' and parcel No. is '8'.          I believe the Registration No. is 319090.     Otherwise it's just for show, and quite attractive with the part frosted sides.


Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: Percival Vickers Biscuit barrel.
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2011, 09:12:06 PM »
Nice one, though it's lost its plating. Biscuit barrels were more for serving biscuits that for keeping them fresh in those days.

http://sites.google.com/site/molwebbhistory/Home/registered-designs/percival-vickers-designs-by-date/percival-vickers-1878
http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,34992.0.html


Offline Paul S.

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Re: Percival Vickers Biscuit barrel.
« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2011, 10:42:58 AM »
thank you  -  very interesting, and I had forgotten Neil's post so appreciate the link.   I don't know if there is a layman's method of telling the difference between chrome plating and electro plating, and can only say that there certainly aren't any marks on my metal lid.   Looking through most of the available books that we refer to (for pressed glass), there seem very few example that are shown with substantial metal components        For what it's  worth,  can also say that the lozenge on my jar seems quite sharp, so maybe produced not too long after the date of registration.   Would also like to thank Neil for his efforts in this matter. :)


 

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