Author Topic: The grand misfit (paperweight dshes / bowls)  (Read 1656 times)

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Offline Roger H

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The grand misfit (paperweight dshes / bowls)
« on: July 23, 2011, 09:55:49 PM »
   I have a most beautiful Perthshire dish and from the design therein I guess it must be the same year as the weight 1997B annual collection. I understood the dishes were often made when a weight colour or setup went a tad wrong but I can find nothing wrong with this one as hard as I look, in fact it looks remarkable. Any comments. Roger.


Offline KevinH

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Re: The grand misfit
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2011, 12:18:43 AM »
It's interesting that the Mahoney / McClanahan book on Perthshire does not mention "paperweight dishes" in the section for "Related Items". That might suggest that all such dishes were made using paperweights that were "a tad wrong".

So, looking closely for something that could be a bit off ... the stem of the opening bud at the top is a bit long and appears to be sprouting horizontally from a petal rather from behind the flower as an extension to part of a hidden stem. Maybe that caused it to be regarded as "dishable"?
KevinH


Offline daveweight

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Re: The grand misfit
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2011, 11:56:46 AM »
Hi Roger
I am sure when a paperweight went wrong during the making process at Perthshire they would turn it into something wlse rather than waste it. I have a large disc or plate of the 1974 Dragonfly Bouquet weight - picture attached
dave


Offline Roger H

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Re: The grand misfit
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2011, 11:11:59 PM »
   Hi Kev, the 1997B in the book doesn't look much better with regard to the top bud situ, but I will say there is a very small bleed over on my left hand flower. Seems a very tiny error to me but perhaps enough.
       Hi Dave, your dragonfly looks a bit out of position compared to the book weight , once again a tad difference. (wonder where tad came from). Tadpole?
    PP82 an PP66 are the only official items I can see as a dish. Have had one other previously but no noticable defect in that either. Anyway makes sense not to waste a lovely "dishy" piece. Regards Roger.


Offline Wuff

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Re: The grand misfit
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2011, 07:03:52 PM »
Amongst the images I have collected over the years from the internet, I have images of dishes in the designs 1983C, PP5, PP14, PP81, PP121.
Wolf Seelentag, St.Gallen
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Offline Frank

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Re: The grand misfit
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2011, 10:12:32 AM »
I am not to happy with the idea that dishes were weights gone wrong, is their any first hand, or other, evidence of this? After all Strathearn were deliberately making a variety of dishes as a product. Did PP ever produce a catalogue of their glassware which was mostly in the 'Ysart' style by Chic Young - I think not as that appears to have only been sold in the Crieff showroom. I know cups were included in some weight catalogues.
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Offline Roger H

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Re: The grand misfit
« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2011, 01:18:25 PM »
   Hi Frank, as a practical item the dish was very good,can be and could have been used for many things whereas the paperweight was either decorational or holding down paper. Can you imagine trying to put peanuts or pins or olives or olive stones or smarties or loose change or ash etc etc into a paperweight. I am surprised the decorative dish isn't or wasn't used much more.
    As for whether the dishes of Perthshire on occasion were made from a slightly faulty weight only someone from the factory would know for sure I guess.
    Perthshire, vasart, Deacons and maybe others have certainly made dishes as a first choice, and would certainly make a nice practical present for a friend.


Offline tropdevin

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Re: The grand misfit
« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2011, 09:17:07 PM »
***

I llike the French description for these items of 'vide-poche', which indicates that you 'empty your pocket' into them. So your coins, keys etc are dumped into them at night, ready for the morning, and a different pair of trousers. ( Aaaggh! Grommet! Wrong trousers...!).

Alan
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Offline jamalpa36

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Re: The grand misfit
« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2011, 12:44:52 PM »
Hi Frank

I have a number of these little bowls, both millefiori and lampwork which I purchased direct from Peter Mcdougall and he told me that they were weights which had gone wrong during the final phase of production and the choice was between throwing them away or converting them to bowls whilst still on the pontil rod. This was both at Perthshire and at his own glassworks

Roy


Offline Derek

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Re: The grand misfit
« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2011, 07:12:38 PM »
Hi Roy

I can vouch for that, as I was actually in Peters Studio when this happened. Something not quite right with the dome so rather than waste it, a few seconds work converted into a pin dish. I know that John Deacons also does the same thing and both he and Peter are ex Perthshire.

Best regards

Derek

 

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