Author Topic: Walther? - ID = Walther "Windsor"  (Read 3330 times)

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Offline AlmasAttic

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Walther?
« Reply #10 on: February 20, 2006, 07:19:03 PM »
Congratulations on your sale Bernard  :P


Offline pamela

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Walther?
« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2006, 07:51:45 PM »
Bernard - thank you! My 'wanted corner' in fact needs nursing! It is always the last one I look at, if at all - always feeling everybody knows what is lacked :roll:
Pamela
http://www.pressglas-pavillon.de
http://www.glas-musterbuch.de

Experience teaches that anyone who begins to collect in any field can feel a change in his soul. He becomes a joyful man filled with a deeper empathy, and a more open understanding of worldly things moves his soul.    (Alfred Lichtwark 1852 1914)


Offline pamela

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Walther?
« Reply #12 on: February 20, 2006, 07:59:20 PM »
it remains the main aim of my collection to represent/document the whole range of Walther and Brockwitz during 1930/40
of course there are many patterns still missing, and it is just so easy to tell: look for an Oxford or Pierrot&Pierette clock for me please - these are rare and more or less  I gave up to find them locally :?
Pamela
http://www.pressglas-pavillon.de
http://www.glas-musterbuch.de

Experience teaches that anyone who begins to collect in any field can feel a change in his soul. He becomes a joyful man filled with a deeper empathy, and a more open understanding of worldly things moves his soul.    (Alfred Lichtwark 1852 1914)


Offline pamela

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Walther?
« Reply #13 on: February 20, 2006, 09:40:26 PM »
Cheri, what is your thinking about the knife then
please do not forget: I shall not be in the office before wednesday
Pamela
http://www.pressglas-pavillon.de
http://www.glas-musterbuch.de

Experience teaches that anyone who begins to collect in any field can feel a change in his soul. He becomes a joyful man filled with a deeper empathy, and a more open understanding of worldly things moves his soul.    (Alfred Lichtwark 1852 1914)


Offline AlmasAttic

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Walther?
« Reply #14 on: February 20, 2006, 09:43:31 PM »
Hi Pamela
I did email you back to the email address you indicated so if you didnt get it maybe check your "spam" box
:)


Offline Bernard C

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Walther?
« Reply #15 on: February 20, 2006, 11:00:10 PM »
Quote from: "pamela"
Oxford ... Pierrot&Pierette clock ... these are rare ... locally ...

Pamela — yet more possible examples of rarity caused by patterns being designed and made for an export market, and then not being successful there, with only one batch being made and shipped.   I believe that this is one of the most frequent causes of rarity (if that is not mutually contradictory).

There is at least one likely case of a glassworks almost always operating this way as their standard policy — Walsh exporting to the USA from c.1875 to c.1910 or later.   I believe Walsh expected their successful designs to be plagiarised by American glassworks, so shipped one large batch to their American agents, and then went back to the drawing board and designed afresh for the next shipment.   This would explain the huge variability of their product range over this period, and why several of the most unusual and important items in the Reynolds collection have been sourced from the USA via eBay.    Their success with this marketing strategy would also explain a report of around 1900 on the Stourbridge glass industry which noted that Walsh was the only glass house operating two furnaces devoted to the production of fancies.

Such a policy would have been unlikely with pressed glass, due to the high initial investment in mouldmaking.   I have yet to see any studies of this economic aspect of historic pressed glass production published in the English language.   Have there ever been any published in German?

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline pamela

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Walther?
« Reply #16 on: February 21, 2006, 07:42:00 PM »
Bernard, thank you!
Still I am a collector and do not know too much on the history  :?
Thanks to D. Mauerhoff I do know that:
all Walther figurines including Pierrot&Pierrette are designs of Fritz Scheiner who joined Walther during the early Thirties. These moulds were used for nearly thirty years, until when Walther collapsed.
I guess that after war most of Walther production was exported to UK.
They would not have exported to Western Germany - that is why it is so rare here. So the Walther glass I do buy now in England is probably of Fifties production but Thirties' pattern.
GDR had their market with the old moulds. New moulds of VEB Sachsenglas never reached that quality.
I do think, Geiselberger and Mauerhoff studied and published a real lot in Pressglas-Korrespondenz - so far all in German language, I'm afraid. But as far as I know they are working on that  :)
Pamela
http://www.pressglas-pavillon.de
http://www.glas-musterbuch.de

Experience teaches that anyone who begins to collect in any field can feel a change in his soul. He becomes a joyful man filled with a deeper empathy, and a more open understanding of worldly things moves his soul.    (Alfred Lichtwark 1852 1914)


 

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