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Author Topic: pub glasses and rummers.  (Read 1196 times)

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Offline Paul S.

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Re: pub glasses and rummers.
« Reply #10 on: September 15, 2011, 12:30:33 PM »
sorry your books are still packed away  -  Hajdamach is too heavy to hold anyway :)...........did you settle near that field you were once discussing?

o.k. then I'll go for it, head on the block time........................the platform of the gadget is that circular part which provides spring loaded pressure to hold the foot of the drinking glass, and is attached to a hollow tube, inside which is a (spring loaded) rod, which when depressed opens the (upper) platform part of the tool, and when released allows the platform to close on the (upper side) of the foot.          Apparently, the platform can be a single or double holding part, and in shape is/are akin to upper case letter 'C'.        Going from illustrations in my book (Wilkinson - so certainly worth buying), the open letter 'C' (the platform) is that part of the gadget that would encase the upper side of the foot of the glass  -  presumably thus leaving a 'C' impression (perhaps feint) on the top side of the foot.       I'm sure Bernard was explaining something about this tool a year or so back, but I've foregotten exacactly when.
This doesn't explain why the 'gadget' should specifically impress a 'Y' or 'T' shaped mark on the underside of the foot - so will someone please explain.

Of course if I've mis-read my book, then I've confused everyone, no doubt  -  only hope I've got this right. :X:

Ref.  'The Hallmarks of Antique Glass'  -   R. Wilkinson  -  1968.


Online oldglassman

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Re: pub glasses and rummers.
« Reply #11 on: September 15, 2011, 02:13:35 PM »
HI ,
          From what I have been told and seen in production the T or Y mark seen on glasses that have been held for finishing by a gadjet is actually the mark left after the glass was sheared by scissors from the blowing rod ,with more than 1 cut required from the scissors,hence the T or Y mark,which would have softened when the glass was replaced in the glory hole to fire polish the rim etc ,unlike those with a snapped pontils which went straight into the lehr after breaking off the punty rod.

Cheers ,
            Peter.


Offline Max

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Re: pub glasses and rummers.
« Reply #12 on: September 15, 2011, 05:07:29 PM »
Quote
From what I have been told and seen in production the T or Y mark seen on glasses that have been held for finishing by a gadjet is actually the mark left after the glass was sheared by scissors from the blowing rod ,


That's pretty much the same as I said earlier, that the cutting from shears (or scissors, whatever) can make that irregular pattern in the glass.  

Incidentally (and no doubt you'll all find this VERY useful - not) with the Murano/Chinese clowns that are often sold 'with scorpion marks' (as if that makes them desirable), what they are actually referring to is the same irregular marks from shears/scissors where glass has been cut to form the clown's buttons, the clown's hat and other areas of applied glass.  So 'scorpion marks' are purely from the manufacturing process, they're not there by design.  :sun:



I am not a man


Offline Paul S.

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Re: pub glasses and rummers.
« Reply #13 on: September 15, 2011, 07:08:28 PM »
However, the shearing marks are not like a 'C', and as Peter has confirmed, they are 'T' or 'Y' shaped where the scissors may have produced more than one cut, and they are found on the underside of the foot only.       As I understand it from Wilkinson, the 'C' mark would appear, feintly perhaps, on the top side of the foot only, and is the impression from the platform of the gadget.     A little knowledge is dangerous, as I know only too well, and my only experience of glass making is that I once stood on the walkway looking down on what may well have been Frank Thrower, when visiting Dartington - more years ago than I care to remember.       It may well have been that shearing, as opposed to snapping the pontil away from the piece, was carried out solely because it is more economical, and saved having to grind/polish the pontil scar afterwards (used on cheaper material (i.e. pub glasses). 

No one should be buying those clowns anyway - kitsch - garish, and very poor taste ;)

P.S.   I understand that the gadget mark is not seen before 1860
P.P.S.  In addition to ..........snapped pontils  -  ground/polished pontil scars and gadget marks, there is a fourth underside finish to the foot, apparently.    This is the 'swirl' effect, and seems to have been created in some way by a different type of gadget.    In place of a 'T' or 'Y', there is the impression of a spiral in the centre of the foot, and may possibly be the result of twisting the piece away at the foot, but I really am not sure.   Date wise it is more or less contemporary with the 'T' and 'Y'.   (This information comes courtesy of Chris Elwell at Chris Buckman Select Antiques).


Online oldglassman

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Re: pub glasses and rummers.
« Reply #14 on: October 22, 2012, 02:37:35 PM »
HI ,
          this  video shows a gadget in use ,T or Y marks would be left if the attached blob used to from the foot was cut by shears , the swirl mark is left if the blob is just trailed off  as seen in the clip .
     http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQGO3wDesLE&feature=related

cheers ,
             Peter


Offline Paul S.

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Re: pub glasses and rummers.
« Reply #15 on: October 23, 2012, 09:29:42 AM »
thanks for posting Peter. :)


 

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