Author Topic: To Repair or Not?  (Read 764 times)

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Offline raj

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To Repair or Not?
« on: January 11, 2012, 12:16:32 AM »
Hello all, I am a novice at pw collecting and just discovered the GMB. One of my recent purchases is what I believe is a Perthshire pw - it has a date cane of P 1970. Long story short, I didn't pay much for it, but it does have some damage. I bought it more as an "educational" piece, but was wondering how does one go about determining if a pw is worth restoring? Any guidance regarding this specific pw or just guidelines in general would be greatly appreciated.


Offline keith

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Re: To Repair or Not?
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2012, 12:28:36 AM »
Hello Raj,welcome,beautiful pwt,I should think the cost of repair depends on how bad the damage is and the 'value' of the weight,I can imagine the costs being high but wait and see what our pwt buffs have to say ;D


Offline mildawg

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Re: To Repair or Not?
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2012, 01:00:35 AM »
Deciding to repair in my opinion is based on how bad the damage might be and where it is at on the weight, value of the weight compared to costs, and personal issues( does the damage bug you).  Damage can often go deeper than it appears and may not be able to be fully repaired without obviously affecting the optics of the weight.  In my opinion and experience it is not terribly expensive to have repaired.  Obviously this depends on the extent of the repairs.  Most repairs for minor chips and bruises could run $50 to $100.00 for more extensive repairs  When selling the weight the buyer is going to take the cost to repair in consideration for what they would pay.  Hence you may or may not end up money ahead but would likely not lose money.  You could always send the weight the restorer and they will or should give you their professional opinion before proceeding. The only cost you would be out is shipping.


Offline daveweight

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Re: To Repair or Not?
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2012, 12:12:33 PM »
Hi Raj,
speaking from personal experience I think a good quality weight like yours is well worth restoring. I bought a Jack Allen paperweight for just £23 as it was badly damaged, as you can see from the picture, and I had it restored beautifully for around £45 but it looks like new now and yours is not so badly damaged so would be much cheaper to repair. 
JA weights are fairly rare so it is nice to have another one in my collection which I am sure is the prototype for the Perthshire 1971 Christmas weight.
Dave


Offline SophieB

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Re: To Repair or Not?
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2012, 02:20:06 PM »
Hi Raj,

Welcome to the GMB.

I agree that restoration is often well worth it. I must admit that damage in full sight (i.e. on the dome) on a weight bugs me immensely (my weakness, I am afraid). However, I have never bothered with (small) chips on the base or on the bottom rim of the weight. 'My' restorer is very good and not expensive and so I take my weights to him without hesitation. He always warns me if something will be costly or/and problematic.

However, a word of warning: in some cases, restoration can be disastrous. I have seen weights which were not enhanced but literally spoilt by restoration; it needs to be done intelligently. Also, on some rare occasion, a weight may crack or break during the process of restoration. I have never experienced this myself but other collectors have.

I am not trying to put you off, just inform you. I know all of this and still get my weights restored.

SophieB

PS: Nice weight, Dave. I admire you, I am not sure I would have taken the risk. I would have been too worried about the extent of the damage/restoration. Good gamble!


Offline Roger H

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Re: To Repair or Not?
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2012, 11:12:24 PM »
    Hi Dave, looking at the restoration on the badly damaged facet I cant really tell how it was done from the photos. The existing glass doesnt seem enough to do it, is the weight much smaller than original? Regards Roger.
       By the way Raj, that is a beautiful weight.


Offline daveweight

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Re: To Repair or Not?
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2012, 11:05:30 AM »
Hi Roger
I had this weight restored by Redhouse Glass Crafts in Stourbridge and they did a fantastic job, as you can see there was quite a chunk out of the weight but it doesn't look reduced in size yet they must have ground most of the original facetting out to get rid of the damage then polish and re- facet it. I did not have it done for finanacial gain but Jack Allen weights are quite rare and I thought it worth trying to save
Dave


Offline Roger H

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Re: To Repair or Not?
« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2012, 10:27:32 PM »
    Thats a lovely job isnt it. And worth it for the historical reason alone.
      Raj, because the damage on the top of your weight has a scrambled lace background to it, it doesnt look too bad really. Can you live with it?
      I am assuming the damage you refer to is the crescent shaped edge of a bruise. Bruises can go deep and unseen and only when the grinding is in progress will its depth be revealed, shallow or not. Nevertheless it could be done as seen by Dave's weight. The choice is still yours but there is no rush for a decision is there.
       Regards Roger.


Offline raj

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Re: To Repair or Not?
« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2012, 07:14:20 PM »
Thank you all for your great input.
Dave, I am stunned at how well your pwt turned out, it gives me great hope for mine.
As you noted Roger, the main damage is the crescent shaped bruise on top, there are a few smaller ones on the side, but between the scrambled lace and green ground, they are really hard to see.
I was thinking I shouldn't even contemplate acquiring a pwt if it has damage, but now I see that repairs with excellent results are possible.
That of course leads to my next question - how do I find a good (and well priced! ;D) restorer? I am in the States.



Offline SophieB

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Re: To Repair or Not?
« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2012, 11:36:43 PM »
Hi Raj,

Sorry cannot help. My restorer is in the UK.

I am sure that some of the Board members from the US will be happy to help, though.

SophieB

 

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