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Author Topic: George Sherwood Eccleston Flint Glass Works St Helens Sugar Bowl & Cream Jug  (Read 2166 times)

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Offline mhgcgolfclub

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Neil

I agree the 2 pictures out of your catalogue look almost certainly to be the same as my sugar and creamer.

I also believe that pictures from catalogues are also not always identical to the finished pieces. I think unless proved other wise you have to say that they are early M&W pieces

Thanks Roy

Offline agincourt17

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Here are a couple of photos of the sugar basin to match Roy’s Sherwood & Co. cream jug in the first post of this topic thread.  The basin is 5 inches high, with a bowl rim diameter of 5 inches. The sugar basin is RD 67468 ( and bears the lozenge for 15 February 1850).

(Permission to re-use of the images of this item on GMB granted by mfor15).

The cream jug, with the same registration date, is RD 67467.   

There were only two other designs registered by George Sherwood and Co. in 1850, both registered on 23 May 1850 – Parcel 4:
RD 69516  tumbler
RD 69517  sugar Basin
so Roy’s sugar basin, also shown in the first post of this topic thread, must be RD 69517.

Does anyone now have a photo of the tumbler RD 69516 to share?

I’ve trawled through the early glass registrations (Thompson, Slack, National Archives online catalogue) and it would seem that the four registrations mentioned here are the sum total of glass designs registered by George Sherwood & Co., Eccleston Flint Glass Works, St. Helens.

Offline agincourt17

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Only 3 years needed to ‘square the circle’ – sort of.

At last a photo of Sherwood’s RD 69516 of 23 May 1850 – Parcel 4, but not just a heavy press-moulded ‘tumbler’, rather a tumbler with an applied handle. 11cm high, and with the appropriate registry date lozenge in the base.

(Permission for the re-use of these images on the GMB granted by Chris Walton).

A photo of a plain tumbler (without the handle) still needed though.

Fred.

Offline nick.a

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Hi,
I recently found this and thought I'd add these pics for reference, and in case Fred or Anne would like to add them to the Registered Designs pictoral database.
They are a yellow uranium variant of the Rd 67468 sugar basin with the lozenge for 15th February 1850 that Fred posted on 27/1/13.
Kind regards
Nick

Offline agincourt17

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Thank you for showing this, Nick. Pretty rare, I would imagine.

I will add them to the GMB RD database shortly.

Fred.

Offline Paul S.

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that uranium sugar is quite a find I'd imagine.                     As a sort of 'completing the picture' effort, here are watermarked National Archive images showing the original factory drawings/paintings for the Registered designs covered by this thread.                  Handles applied to tumblers seems to have been a not uncommon addition in the second half of the C19 - I wonder why  -  perhaps there really was a shortage of handled tankards, yet there was much use made I had thought of pewter tankards for ale.               Possibly tankards are easier to hold than smooth sided tumblers which would be quite heavy and prone to being dropped if wet.
Inwald (Czechoslovakia - then Davidson) did quite a few from memory between the first and second WW, often as commemorative pieces.

I wonder who added the handle to the tumbler shown here, and looking at the sugar basin Rd. 69517, there seems to be quite a difference in shape between the artists impression shown in the factory drawing, and the final product which looks far more flared.

Offline agincourt17

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Thank you for showing these, Paul.

The images are really nicely rendered, especially considering how comparatively early they are in the chronology of design registrations.

Fred.

Offline Paul S.

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Being a bit slow on the uptake, I've only just realized that there is a source of potential inaccuracy lurking in the above - compounded by my own failure to look at the details properly.
Other folk may well be aware of the difference, but having looked at the Kew images again, and checked the Registrant's names shown in the Register at Kew, there appear to be two different company names involved in these four Registrations.

In the Kew Register for Nos. 67467 and 67468, the Registrant's name is stated as Sherwood & Co., and this can be seen on the relevant pix above  -  whereas the later pair 69516 and 69517 are shown in the Register as George Sherwood & Co. - although unlike the first pair, these later drawings don't actually carry the Registrant's name.

Both Thompson and Slack show the correct details for each pair of Registrations, and I've mentioned this difference now since it doesn't appear to have cropped up during the course of this thread.       

Offline agincourt17

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Thank you, Paul.

I will check the details on my reference file photos and the GMB RD database and amend if necessary.

Fred.

Offline nick.a

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Thanks Fred & Paul, one of those lucky finds on Ebay where the postage costs more than the item  :)
Thanks to you both for the additional information. As Fred says Paul, those images are rather smart. Strange, the difference in the quality of pictoral information given upon registration, given the business implications, both great care and none.
Kind regards
Nick

 

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