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Author Topic: 19th century, probably Bohemian, overshot glass large footed vase with gilding  (Read 1463 times)

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Offline Max

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Don't you DARE find any exciting information on that glass.  I gave mine away when I sold the shedfull of glass that I had for £250.  If you find anything, warn me so that I can either a) boil my head or b) run to the hills screaming or c) find you at a glass fair and kick your shins.   :rn: :o :rn:

I am not a man


Offline flying free

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I've been there Max  :hug: I sold something to the States a while ago for what was a good price for me...I've just seen it listed for 6 x what I sold it for ::)  not sold yet though  ;D

I've looked for information on this overshot for quite a long time - it's a peculiar passion of mine lol, but it's not in any of my books (mine are fairly meagre references for antique glass really though) and all I know is that it is fairly rare to see any pieces, never mind not damaged (and mine is not , hence my excitement).  If I do find anything I'll keep it to myself then  :ooh:
m


Offline Max

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::glares:::   ;)

Is this glass overshot though?  I'm not great (read rubbish) at technical stuff...but overshot doesn't seem like the right term to me...?
I am not a man


Offline chopin-liszt

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I've been getting curious about that too - overshot to me, means what I also sometimes know as "matthey crinkles" (I may have spelled that wrongly) that nasty-feeling texture gained from rolling hot glass in grains of  glass, which stick to it - like the Chance Spiderweb coloured bits.

(We had tumblers like this for our juice when we were kids - and they felt just horrible. I'm sure they're the reason I can't stand diluted squash!)
Cheers, Sue (M)

Three Wise Women would have asked for directions, arrived on time, delivered the baby, cleaned the stables and made a casserole...

And there WOULD have been peace on earth.


Offline flying free

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yes as far as I am aware it is i.e. rolled in bits ...but then reheated , and then blown out a bit further.  So the overshot is melted slightly so not sharp and it has the effect of the shards 'separating' once it has been blown out a bit  which makes it looks slightly crackled.  It's not blown into a textured mould for example. Well, I'm open to correction but as far as I know that is what this is....
It is different to say the overshot on my lampshade, which I believe was rolled in smaller bits and not blown out otherwise it would have lost the shape of the lampshade bowl bit, which was mould blown then rolled in shards.  With the lampshade I think the edges were hot worked once it had been rolled in shards,  but not the bowl bit....again I'm open to correction here.

m

Offline chopin-liszt

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Your beast here looks more as if it's been finely crizzled - ie. dipped in cold water to crack a hot surface then heated and reblown.  :spls:
Cheers, Sue (M)

Three Wise Women would have asked for directions, arrived on time, delivered the baby, cleaned the stables and made a casserole...

And there WOULD have been peace on earth.

Offline flying free

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I had another look at it after the question...and it is nothing like my other crackle glass pieces.  I think you would be hard pushed to create that level of crackle by dipping and reblowing without it falling apart...but again I could be wrong.  All my other crackle bits are fairly 'un-uniform' in their crackle, i.e. there are 'patches' of smooth glass between the crackles and some are tiny and some are large.  This piece is uniform in it's texture, quite sharp but not cutting sharp as it has been melted slightly.  I am pretty sure it is overshot.  It's just that Matthey Crinkles for example are much smaller bits than the shards used on my glass, and with Matthey pieces, once the glass has been rolled in Matthey crinkles it isn't blown out any further, leaving a piece just covered in the 'sharp'teeny tiny bits of crinkles, which makes it feel like sandpaper.
It's all the overshot technique, but the final outcome depends on how big the pieces of overshot were and whether it's been blown further or not I think.
m

Offline flying free

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edited to add article on overshot here
and I am open to correction on my description above
as I have significantly limited knowledge of the glass blowing process
 :-\
http://www.theglassmuseum.com/overshot.htm
m

Offline chopin-liszt

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 :thud:
I actually followed all that, M. :smg:
Now I need a rest, to recover.  :ooh:
Cheers, Sue (M)

Three Wise Women would have asked for directions, arrived on time, delivered the baby, cleaned the stables and made a casserole...

And there WOULD have been peace on earth.

Offline Lustrousstone

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Matthey Crinkles is completely different. A sticky "transfer" is put onto the cold item, which is then coated in powered frit. Refiring makes the transfer crinkle and presumably burn off so that the frit forms little fired-on clumps. Chance Expressions p16. P keeps her crinkly hyacinth vases in the bathroom!

 

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