Author Topic: Glass Collecting as an investment  (Read 1892 times)

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Offline BohaGlass

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Glass Collecting as an investment
« on: February 20, 2012, 09:11:06 AM »
Hello Everyone,

I am thinking of starting a collection of British glass as a pension plan.

I have about 15 pieces of Isle of Wight, but wouldn't want to part with any of them.

As an investment for the future, what British glass would you recommend collecting?

I was considering Nailsea Glass - the factory is only three miles from us but sadly it's now buried under a Tescos Car park.
Barnaby Kirsen
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Offline johnphilip

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Re: Glass Collecting as an investment
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2012, 07:00:05 PM »
Well i had that brilliant idea about 25/30 years ago now i have a house full of good glass that i cant sell even at reasonable prices .  sorry but i would look elsewhere . Become a politician and get paid for incompetance , the more you cock up the  more you are paid and the bigger your pension  :grrr:


Offline Max

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Re: Glass Collecting as an investment
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2012, 10:21:28 PM »
I'd look elsewhere for a pension fund too.  Only collect it if you like it....or the other way is to research it and try and find it cheap at bootfairs or somewhere to sell it on later.  That's the only way you're going to make any money at the moment and it's fun at least.   :thup:

I am not a man


Offline flying free

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Re: Glass Collecting as an investment
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2012, 11:44:28 PM »
glass collecting for investment would be about as predictable as playing the money markets  - a lot more fun perhaps as in having colourful things to look at rather than just bits of paper with numbers on,  but just as UN predictable.  And it would come with the same tagline 'please note the value of your glass may go up or down'.  And it's quite a bit more volatile in my opinion (if anything can be more volatile than the markets).
I couldn't recommend buying art for investment as in my opinion, unless you are prepared to also create and drive the market for demand, or unless you have money to burn on losing out on the no hopers you bought by accident - one is statistically unlikely to win overall in the long term.  However of course, people do buy art for investment, but I think they are the ones who can afford to lose the money if they made a mistake.   And glass does not have the same PR machine or 'voice' as say sculpture or paintings out in the wide world. Unfortunately.
m


Offline nigel benson

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Re: Glass Collecting as an investment
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2012, 11:47:35 PM »
I'm afraid we have a number of cynics in our ranks on this board ;)!!!!

Actually, having been a full-time glass dealer specialising in British Glass for the last well, nearly 26 years, I think that there are indeed areas that you could collect and get a good return, providing that you are looking at a mid to long term investment. A minimum of five years (in most cases) will mean that you get your original investment back. This is a rule of thumb and naturally can vary, according to the item. I have known some items that have gone up throughout the twenty five or so years, and others that have dropped off the scale.

My suggestion would be that you use a good quality dealer, who has a track record, who can advise you and give you the confidence to back you own judgement over a period of time.

Like many investments, glass has its ups and downs and fashion can play its part, so the use of a dealer can pay you back through their knowledge of the subject. However, if your aim is to enjoy yourself while collecting then you need to do some research and look for areas that interest you and give you pleasure.

The scatter gun approach can work, as can the bootfair/charity shop circuit, however both have their shortcomings, which usually entails gathering large numbers of items together, but with only a small proportion having lasting value. This is not to put down that way of collecting, just to give advice, Some folks have been known to have a lot of luck through both methods, but that is not always the case if you are thinking in terms of an investment.

Be judicious and buy quality items in good condition! And, develope a good 'eye'.

Lastly, but importantly, only have this as part of a diverse portfolio of investments. It never does to put all your eggs in one basket  ;) :)

Kind wishes, Nigel


Offline KevinH

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Re: Glass Collecting as an investment
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2012, 12:02:19 AM »
I suggest anything by Mike Hunter could have good investment potential - but probably not as a pension plan.

Maybe cameo work by Helen Millard or Jonathan Harris could eventually become as good an investment as the 19th century cameo by George Woodall etc.
KevinH


Offline flying free

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Re: Glass Collecting as an investment
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2012, 12:03:59 AM »
Nigel you put it well  :)

I would add to my input,  that if you are going to buy glass as 'part' of an investing portfolio, then you buy top end and in very good condition.  And as with anything that is going to be done for investment, prior to the fun buying bit,  it is vital to do the requisite in depth research, which of course takes time and money.
Have fun and enjoy  :)
m


Offline johnphilip

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Re: Glass Collecting as an investment
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2012, 08:54:22 AM »
Part of the problem is there is so much pretty glass coming out of China and parts of Europe for so little money its affecting prices , i do agree you can make a profit out of the best pieces but its harder to find really good pieces , Coz Bothery Nigel has them all stuck away in his kitchen , then their is the breakage problem like when someone crashes a hoover into your show stand , :cry: init Nigel  :cry:. More people are buying glass these days but a lot of it is from Dear old TK Max .


Offline scavo

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Re: Glass Collecting as an investment
« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2012, 11:30:36 AM »
I'm new to glass but have collected and sold in different areas over the last 25 years. In some areas I bought and sold for quick turn-over - other items I have hung onto and taken to longer term investment approach. Both have worked for me to varying degrees. I have used the charity shop, car boot and flea market 'scatter-gun' method with relative success.

In a completely different area, posters, I made good money on a ten year investment.

As I say, I'm new to glass so I don't know much about Nailsea glass. But as you are close to the old works there might be a lot of it about at investment prices? Having googled Nailsea I imagine there is already an established market for it. However, if you consider it to be currently undervalued there may be room.

The price of gold bullion has more than doubled in 7 years - based on the price of Thai gold I didn't buy in 2005. As they say, we more often regret what we didn't do more than that we did?


Offline Paul S.

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Re: Glass Collecting as an investment
« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2012, 08:45:46 PM »
I'd suggest buying 5 - 7 acres and starting up a quality boot sale.       No new goods - encourage the antique dealers and good bric-a-brac sellers to come in - high class butchers and green grocers are permitted however, with flower sellers and a good ice cream van also (you have to encourage families with kids, and they always want an ice cream).   With 250 - 300 pitches at say £12 a throw - transits and lorries at higher rates - and the punters pay a quid on exit  -   you could be spending your winters abroad at that rate.    I'll be your agent ;D

 

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