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Author Topic: peacock eye trailed vases - Stuart or Walsh? late 19th or Edwardian?  (Read 2877 times)

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Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: peacock eye trailed vases - Stuart or Walsh? late 19th or Edwardian?
« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2012, 11:13:21 AM »
I don't know about sporrans, they tend to have dangly toggles and furry things, but they're certainly used to decorate the hilts of Skean Dhus, and the big brooches used to pin sashes at the shoulder.
Stating the obvious, they're named after the mountain range where they're found.
Cheers, Sue (M)

“All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.” Friedrich Nietzsche


Offline Paul S.

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Re: peacock eye trailed vases - Stuart or Walsh? late 19th or Edwardian?
« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2012, 02:42:16 PM »
A Skean Dhu being the small sheathed dagger kept hidden in the mens long socks - although maybe not now pc to carry such an item.
quote.........."Stating the obvious, they're named after the mountain range where they're found"...............that's not the daggers, socks, sporrans, dangly toggles or even furry things............but the the semi-precious form of smokey quartz. ;) ;)               and apologies to m for :hj:


Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: peacock eye trailed vases - Stuart or Walsh? late 19th or Edwardian?
« Reply #12 on: March 05, 2012, 04:02:13 PM »
 :pb:
I knew what I meant.  :smg:
Cheers, Sue (M)

“All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.” Friedrich Nietzsche


Offline flying free

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Re: peacock eye trailed vases - Stuart or Walsh? late 19th or Edwardian?
« Reply #13 on: March 20, 2012, 08:22:42 AM »
Just bumping this trying to and clarify some more information.
In the 1907 Harrods catalogue pages there are more vases shown than those on page 53 of the Glass Association Journal 1997 (catalogue Harrods 1909 pages).  But in both there is a wavy rimmed mushroom posy that comes under what Harrods call 'The English Jewel' decoration.  In a previous thread I read that Stuart may not have made a wavy rimmed mushroom posy until the 30's.  The range is a different 'decor' to my vase shown below which I believe is what Harrods called "the original English 'Peacock' decoration", but I did think this range "The 'English Jewel' decoration" was also a Stuart range.  Can anyone confirm whether it is or isn't please?
My vase is 7" tall and the 'Peacock' eyes are green with dark jade green centres.
Thanks
m


Offline johnphilip

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Re: peacock eye trailed vases - Stuart or Walsh? late 19th or Edwardian?
« Reply #14 on: March 20, 2012, 10:13:19 AM »
Come on Nigel i hope your not sulking ?  ??? soon be time for The Brum Glass fair that will cheer you up .  ;)


Offline flying free

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Re: peacock eye trailed vases - Stuart or Walsh? late 19th or Edwardian?
« Reply #15 on: March 20, 2012, 10:48:06 AM »
for the record, I'm not trying to research Stuart or even trailed vases in general  :)
But I am trying to identify the maker of three vases I have, one with applied trails the others not, but all by the same maker and nothing like the clear with applied trails vases being discussed on here.  However, I am  hoping by a process of elimination, to get closer to who might have made my vases.
Any help would be very much appreciated  :)
m


Offline flying free

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Re: peacock eye trailed vases - Stuart or Walsh? late 19th or Edwardian?
« Reply #16 on: April 18, 2012, 10:12:54 AM »
http://www.auctions-fischer.de/catalogues/online-catalogues/199.html?L=1&kategorie=67&artikel=16646&cHash=3f91725e2f

another contender for Peacock trail vases? or an incorrect identification?

Kristallglasfabrik Wilhelm Staigerwald Regenhütte

m


Offline flying free

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Re: peacock eye trailed vases - Stuart or Walsh? late 19th or Edwardian?
« Reply #17 on: May 20, 2012, 08:48:45 PM »

I think this looks like a Stuart shape with the cup and the shallow frilled rim.

ebay item no 370612102470

Do we know they did these amethyst pad-like 'peacock eye' and trails?  I was told they only did green but I think they did peacock eye applications in amber with a green eye as well.  And now this amethyst which although not having a 'centre' to the eye, is so similar to Stuart designs I can't believe it isn't.  However the 'pad' is also similar to a signed STevens and Williams vase I've seen but the body of the vase (shape, 'cup' and rim) look like Stuart to me.
m


Offline flying free

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Re: peacock eye trailed vases - Stuart or Walsh? late 19th or Edwardian?
« Reply #18 on: July 30, 2012, 05:05:22 PM »
Harrach peacock eye vase here for future reference
http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,48592.msg274652.html#msg274652 along with another piece posted directly afterwards
as well as other Stuart pieces further up the thread and at the start of the topic
m


Offline nigel benson

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Re: peacock eye trailed vases - Stuart or Walsh? late 19th or Edwardian?
« Reply #19 on: July 31, 2012, 12:12:03 AM »
I saw this thread when it first started and frankly decided not to make any comment when the first four posts were all made by the original questioner. This left me realing with the number of questions asked and the complexity that had been created. The thread has gone on and only seemed to get worse :o

A question from me. Why on earth are you using a Harrods retail catalogue in oder to help work out the problem? The name they use is their own creation referring to items that they have bought on a wholesale basis from what could even be more than one English maker. This means that these items would have no references on them that would identify the maker. The same happened at other companies, another being the London shop Liberty, who retailed for instance Thomas Webb items as 'English Glass'. Therefore it is useless as a primary source of identification and is likely to just confuse you - unless of course you have actually identified which company supplied those items?

Another query, why can't two or more manufacturers use the same (similar) colour in producing similar items, in this case what you are referring to as 'trailed' pieces? It happens throughout glass making history. Certainly manufacturers occasionally made ranges for tens of years, not just a couple of years after their design. If soething was commercially successful they would continue to produce it, if not it would likely just dissappear from the catalogue pages.

I'm astonished that you have given Miller's guides so much credance assuming that it is they who actually research the photographs that they use. In my experience through Millers direct use of my items, (and via other dealers) I can tell you that they rely upon the dealer, or the auctioneer who supplies the image to supply the information.

Millers come to the dealer (or collector) and take the photographs, which they then own and have copyright to. The owner of the item supplies a brief description, its designer, and/or manufacturer and of course the value. The former can be inaccurate and the latter can be manipulated according to any agenda that might be in the head of the items owner. Therefore, whilst a useful yearly publication, there can be built in problems. This also can occur on the website, which on the odd occasion I have had cause to draw attention to an inaccuracy.

The 'mushroom' posy simply refers to a shape and is not dependant on size.

To be honest, although you are likely to begin to get a handle on this subject through looking at things in publications and on the Internet, the only way that you can really get the differences sorted out is to go digging in the archives of the relavant companies. Not such a helpful comment I know, but probably realistic I'm afraid ;) :)

I find buying and owning identifiable pieces is the best thing to do. Live with them and the differences and similarities begin to emerge. Of course this can be expensive, but that is the nature of learning IMHO. Largely speaking, research ain't cheap.

Cheers, Nigel

 

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