Author Topic: antique[ irish] cork glass  (Read 986 times)

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Offline classinaglass

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irish cork glass
« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2012, 04:53:43 PM »
diff views


Offline Wayne

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Re: irish cork glass
« Reply #11 on: March 22, 2012, 04:57:10 PM »
Hi, I don't know if you realise, but you're making a brand new thread for every post you make, instead of having them all in one thread?  Your original thread is here:

http://www.glassmessages.com/index.php/topic,46516.msg261250.html#msg261250

Just go to that thread, then click "reply" to add more posts, pics etc.


Offline classinaglass

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irish cork glass marks
« Reply #12 on: March 22, 2012, 05:08:13 PM »
hi ,im 100% sure this is cork glass the lozenge date is faint but deffinetly there on the top part,& with my eyepiece i can see the words cork in relief letters i will have another look tonight as there are other relief letters ,,saw the word cork,, witch was enough proof to me,ty craig,,ps any info or opinions would be very welcome


Offline classinaglass

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Re: irish cork glass marks
« Reply #13 on: March 22, 2012, 06:37:21 PM »
hi,can anyone suggest a trusted glass apraiser 


Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: irish cork glass
« Reply #14 on: March 22, 2012, 07:12:47 PM »
Welcome to the gmb!

You can add up to 4 images per posting.


I'm going to ask a moderator to sort your postings out into one thread - I see Wayne's pointed out you don't need a new thread for every picture either. Don't worry, we all make mistakes to start off with.

But would you please, please, use full words with spaces between them - I can't read your text-y style posts, they really confuse me. I'm an old bag who doesn't even use a mobile phone.

Also, this is an international forum - lots of members don't have english as their first language, and it must be impossible for them to understand!
Thanks in advance. :)
Cheers, Sue (M)

“All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.” Friedrich Nietzsche


Offline Anne

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Re: antique[ irish] cork glass
« Reply #15 on: March 22, 2012, 07:26:42 PM »
I've rounded up all the different topics by classinaglass and combined them into this topic to keep all the info together.

classinaglass,  to reply to this topic use the blue reply button at the top or bottom of the topic rather than creating a whole new topic please. If you get stuck feel free to ask for help.


Offline chopin-liszt

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Re: antique[ irish] cork glass
« Reply #16 on: March 22, 2012, 07:30:21 PM »
Thanks, Anne
- boy, that was quick! :o
Cheers, Sue (M)

“All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.” Friedrich Nietzsche


Offline Paul S.

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Re: antique[ irish] cork glass
« Reply #17 on: March 22, 2012, 07:51:36 PM »
I'm sure that classinaglass won't object to us using his name, which I understand from his off-board messages to me, is Craig. :)

I had thought from Craig's earlier communications regarding this matter of the 'Cork' mark, that we were talking about cut glass - although from what I can see from the images now posted, it appears to be pressed glass.           The date that I mentioned of 1818, when The Cork Glass Co. ceased trading, would have been too early for a general piece of pressed glass such as this comport or cake stand.   Besides which, lozenge marks (indicating the registration details) didn't commence until 1842 and even then that might have applied to areas of the U.K other than Eire.

Will you confirm please Craig if the lozenge of which you are talking,  appears to be the usual U.K. Registration cartouche (containing the year/month/parcel No.)        At the top of the lozenge there should be a cirlce enclosing a Roman 'III'.      Otherwise I'm a bit lost :)


Offline classinaglass

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Re: antique[ irish] cork glass
« Reply #18 on: March 22, 2012, 10:25:48 PM »
hi paul yes its clearer than i thought & it has an oval with III will try get good pic on


Offline Paul S.

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Re: antique[ irish] cork glass
« Reply #19 on: March 22, 2012, 10:59:22 PM »
hello Craig.        Unless you can produce a very sharp close up picture, then I doubt that we'd see the details adequately to read them.   However, all is not lost  -   simply draw the diamond on a piece of paper and include the semi-circles in each of the four inside corners of the lozenge.    Then write into these four circles the letters or Nos. that you can see on the glass  -  making sure that you place the drawn details in the same order as you see them on the glass (it can make a difference - so don't get it wrong).     You can then either simply tell us what you have within the diamond, and in which corner  -  or take a snap of your drawing, and post the picture.     Someone here will then interpret your details, and hopefully then tell you much more about your piece of glass - which may well turn out to be Victorian, rather than pre Victorian.        If you look at your piece you should see mould lines (3 or 4 perhaps) running down the outside of the glass, and terminating at the foot.   
So where does the word 'Cork' appear in relation to the diamond??

 

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