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Author Topic: Two wine cordials....  (Read 1018 times)

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Offline Nancy128

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Two wine cordials....
« on: March 24, 2006, 07:14:35 PM »
Found these at an estate sale today.  The cut glass one might be Val St. Lambert?  The pattern looks familiar, but I thought I toss it out to you guys.  The other green cordial, I don't know anything about, but that its really pretty.  Do any of these look familiar?

Thanks, Nancy

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Offline Frank

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Two wine cordials..
« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2006, 08:29:15 PM »
Great stem on the 2nd but no ideas. I split your postings for you.
Frank A.
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Offline Ivo

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Two wine cordials..
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2006, 09:16:44 PM »
Cordials with a twisted stem like your green one were made to special order right until the 1950s in Belgium; I do not know which factory (could be Chênée) but I know that the oldest Amsterdam liqueur bar used these in clear with an etched logo - until the factory went under and they could not get new supplies. These glasses still turn up in the antiques trade but they are getting quite rare.
If it one of the Belgians, then the foot should be made in a clapper, i.e. smooth and flat, no pontil marks or kickups.

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