Author Topic: Walsh cut bowl  (Read 771 times)

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Offline Paul S.

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Walsh cut bowl
« on: July 14, 2012, 06:28:17 PM »
trying to fly the flag for cut glass - thought I'd show this bowl as probably not a common item on the board.          Shown in Reynolds on page 56 (fig. 167 (WE = for 'WALSH ENGLAND') - and according to the book made anywhere between c. 1930 - 51.    Not given a pattern No. so presumably not included in the images at the back of the book, although if anyone does know of a name do please do shout.         Exceptionally deep and wide mitres (almost 20mm wide in places) - and unusual (in my opinion) for the large areas of the bowl that remain plain (uncut) - seen best looking out from the inside.      Long ring when flicked and a very bright and crystal coloured glass (so likely to be towards the end of the factory's life - do people think?).    Not easy to photograph, so apologies for poor side shot of bowl.


Offline keith

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Re: Walsh cut bowl
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2012, 12:30:59 AM »
Great find Paul,impressive piece,very green here! ;D ;D


Offline Bernard C

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Re: Walsh cut bowl
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2012, 05:25:57 AM »
Paul Spectacular item, typical of what I believe to be Clyne Farquharson's major update of existing patterns before he embarked upon his signature ranges.   In my opinion that magnificent base star with the off-centre subsidiary cuts, and integrated with the main design, is pure Farquharson, as is the expanse of blank space, emphasizing the bold star.   The cross-cut squares design is an old pattern dating back to the early 1920s at least, and was a mainstay of Walsh cut (and pressed) production up to the closure in 1951.    It is found orientated both diagonally and horizontally.   I have a lovely Tudor cylinder vase incorporating the cross-cut squares design which shows that the Walsh cutting team continued production after moving to Tudor Crystal.

If anyone ever organises an exhibition of early Farquharson, your bowl should be a centrepiece.

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Bernard C

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Re: Walsh cut bowl
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2012, 08:46:11 AM »
...   Not given a pattern No. so presumably not included in the images at the back of the book   ...

Paul No, not the case.   Eric missed some of his pictured pieces in the pattern books, usually the same basic cut reinterpreted on a different blank, so quite understandably.   I've done the same here on the GMB.   Those Walsh pattern books are difficult to work through and to learn.   I see something new every time I study them.   Fortunately there are several members who are becoming familiar with them, so any erroneous conclusion here is likely to be challenged.

Back to your bowl.   Please will you will it to me (just in case).   ;D

Bernard C.  8)
Text and Images Copyright 200414 Bernard Cavalot


Offline Paul S.

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Re: Walsh cut bowl
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2012, 10:49:49 AM »
sincere thanks for the enthusiastic response, and of course the additional information from Bernard :)    I agree, those pattern book designs are hard on the eye, and whilst better for being there than not, demand stamina when viewing.         The design of the base star is refreshing to see after looking at so many simple radiating stars, obviously the mark of a innovative designer.     
I think we'd all be hard pressed to be critical of a great piece like this  -  but I do have a gripe, and that concerns what I assume to be the slightly over-done fire polishing - something not too uncommon on a lot of run-of-the mill cut pieces from the mid C20, which takes away some of sharpness of cutting.       My supposed C19 Irish/Scottish bowl posted in 'Glass' on 12th July has that sharp feeling which remains after cutting - perhaps fire polishing was a process that came later in the C20.
Good to see your comment that........."Fortunately there are several members who are becoming familiar with them, so any erroneous conclusion here is likely to be challenged."

As to my dying intestate, and this bowl going back to a boot sale or charity shop, I shall make sure that whatever happens, it goes to a good home :)              Food for thought, though, this question of what we do with our glass, ultimately, when the grim reaper calls.    Sell it all quickly at the first sign of a sneeze - or donate it to a local museum - there's no one in my family with the slightest interest (they're all philistines).          Perhaps this is a debate suitable for the cafe. :)   



Offline keith

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Re: Walsh cut bowl
« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2012, 02:08:01 PM »
That's something I thought about but when you're pushing up daisy's you won't really give a fig!


Offline nigel benson

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Re: Walsh cut bowl
« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2012, 08:00:09 PM »
A question, what is 'fire polishing' in the context of this discussion?

Thanks, Nigel


Offline Paul S.

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Re: Walsh cut bowl
« Reply #7 on: July 16, 2012, 08:43:27 AM »
I sense a sinking feeling coming on.............
Nigel, I was suggesting that it referred to the process of using heat to smooth (slightly) the sharp edges of the cut design.          The 'feel' of C19 and early C20 cut glass is much sharper than later material, and my assumption was that heat was used to achieve this.     
Await your comments with interest.   


Offline glassobsessed

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Re: Walsh cut bowl
« Reply #8 on: July 16, 2012, 09:55:36 AM »
Heat is not used for that purpose (as far as I am aware) but dipping the whole object into a vat of strong acid is. This process smooths the sharp edges, brief description here under Acid-polishing: http://www.great-glass.co.uk/glass%20notes/glossa-e.htm

John


Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: Walsh cut bowl
« Reply #9 on: July 16, 2012, 10:12:30 AM »
Heat is/was used for rims, seams (?) and pontil marks, where it is much easier to apply locally and evenly

 

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