Author Topic: Orrefors Edvin Ohrstrom bowl - confirmation and date assistance please.  (Read 740 times)

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Offline jakgene

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Hi - recently bought this gorgeous bowl.
signed to base Orrefors F 2611-131 (could possibly be 2411 rather than 2611)

I think the F means an Edvin Ohrstrom design - and I found in Google images a similar bowl which was described as a 1941 design. Does anyone know if this is correct please?

Bowl is 10 cm or 4 inches tall, and 20 cm or 8 inches in diameter. It is clear glass, not the ice blue.  Lots of wear to base.  Weighs 3.75 kg  (almost 7.5 lb ) so very heavy!
Thanks
Jackie
West Oz.
jakgene
Western Australia
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Offline kisslikeether

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Hi Jackie
2611 is indeed the design code used in 1941 so that does tie in with what you have seen before.


Offline jakgene

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Thanks - the info I had came from an ebay listing - they can be inaccurate........... ;D

Jackie
jakgene
Western Australia
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Offline Bill G

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Hi:

A quick note.

Your Ohrström bowl is not glass. It is crystal which accounts for it being heavy and having the
optics created by this material.

Best
Bill Geary


Offline jakgene

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Thanks Bill - the optic effects are what I love!. - but I have always wondered what the difference is - is it lead content ? or what is it that makes crystal rather than glass?

Jackie



jakgene
Western Australia
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Offline ahremck

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Hi Jackie,

In the early days glass tended to be coloured - a slightly brownish colour for most ordinary soda glass and a very pale grey for crystal.  Crystal was achieved by adding lead salts to the mix which decolourised the brownness and also had the effects of increasing the refraction, decreasing the hardness(and thus making cutting easier), and of course, increasing the density.  Modern glass is all clear unless it is ultra cheap of deliberately tinted.

Most modern crystal is what is called 24% lead content - typical for "Bohemia" crystal.  The really high end tends to be even higher as the refraction is increased and the cutting becomes more brilliant.  Thus Stuart always advertised 30% and Waterford may have been even higher.  You should also mbe aware there are crystals at around 18%in the marketplace.  Also "Kristal" can simply refer to glass.

There is a downside to the lead content.  If the wine alcohol oxidises it first becomes acetone and the acetic acid(AKA vinegar).  As it happens lead acetate is extremely soluble so what tends to happen is the a small amount of lead is leached out of the glass into the wine.  This takes a long time but it leads to that milkiness common in the bases of old decanters.

Ross
I bamle all snileplg eorrrs on the Cpomuter Kyes.  They confuse my fingers !!!

Offline jakgene

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Hi Ross, thanks for the explanation - now I see!

With the bowls I collect I don't think I am in danger of lead poisoning! I won't be pouring spirits into them for sure!
regards

Jackie
jakgene
Western Australia
Mid 20 Century Glass
British Glass, Scandinavian Glass, Murano Glass,
Paperweights. (and anything gorgeous!)

 

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