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Author Topic: What is 'marbrie' decoration?  (Read 386 times)

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Offline flying free

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What is 'marbrie' decoration?
« on: August 06, 2012, 09:05:48 AM »
I'm trying to investigate an old perfume bottle which I'll bump in a minute, but I noticed on a paperweight thread that someone described a weight as Marbrie.  That appears to be a description of a pulled feathered loop type decoration?  is that term applied to items other than weights?  Does it relate to a time period in particular?
thanks
m


Offline Ivo

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Re: What is 'marbrie' decoration?
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2012, 09:17:38 AM »
sounds like a misread "marbré" - marbled in French
Ivo
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Offline flying free

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Re: What is 'marbrie' decoration?
« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2012, 10:00:01 AM »
thanks Ivo  :)


Offline Lustrousstone

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Re: What is 'marbrie' decoration?
« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2012, 10:18:18 AM »
I think it's actually a very paperweight specific description encompassing pulled decoration and not time specific


Offline flying free

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Re: What is 'marbrie' decoration?
« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2012, 10:28:07 AM »
thanks  :)


Offline KevinH

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Re: What is 'marbrie' decoration?
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2012, 11:00:54 PM »
As Christine said, it is a term used for a type of paperweight design. I have never seen it used in respect of other glass items, which if they have a similar design would be more simply called "looped", "gadrooned" or "feathered".

It could have be a variation of the French marbre, but I do not know the actual source of the term.

In the paperweight design it is usually a pulled pattern in four, or occasionally six, loops and normally with multi-coloured threads. The loops are worked to the top of the dome and capped with at least one millefiori cane to cover the join of the loop threads.

Earliest examples are (probably) from the French Saint Louis factory of the 19th century. Several examples can be found on the Internet, but here is one in a Bonhams Auction page.
KevinH


Offline Frank

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Re: What is 'marbrie' decoration?
« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2014, 01:55:04 PM »
It is used for other glass than paperweights, also ceramics, furniture etc. by auction houses, but have yet to find a non-20th century or makers usage. I even found one example given as Marbrie/Nailsea. It might be better to use in preference to Nailsea!

Marbrie (probably anglicised derivation from Marbré) is a decoration simulating marble. Nothing to do with marbles for which the French is billes.
Frank A.
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Offline flying free

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Re: What is 'marbrie' decoration?
« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2014, 02:43:11 PM »
Kev, thank you,  it was a long time ago but I'm sorry, I missed your reply.  Frank thank you.

 it definitely irks me to see all and sundry described as ' Nailsea':
- firstly because much of the all and sundry appears to be fairly recent (and 20th century stuff)
- and secondly because describing something as Nailsea appears to me at least,to imply old and English (when mostly what I see is not)
In some ways I think I just prefer 'pulled feathered design'. That at least is properly descriptive and doesn't imply age :)
m





Offline Frank

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Re: What is 'marbrie' decoration?
« Reply #8 on: September 02, 2014, 02:57:44 PM »
That would not differentiate the loopy style from feathering though. Pooled loops perhaps? I guess restoring to the French Marbre would not catch on, despite removing some ambiguity from an invented word. Nah, I like Marbrie ;)
Frank A.
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Offline flying free

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Re: What is 'marbrie' decoration?
« Reply #9 on: September 02, 2014, 03:56:25 PM »
As a matter of interest is the feathered type of decoration created in a different way to pulled looped decoration?

I'll find the perfume bottle pic later and link it here just so there is an image of what I described as pulled feathered - just for future ref in case anyone is interested in seeing pics of what is discussed.
I don't own any Marbrie paperweights :'( so can't link an image of one of those.
m

 



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